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Thread: Who am I?

  1. #1726
    Tends to be difficult JL25and3's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Four names. What about one of your favorites? This four-named guy, worked long and hard for one lifetime record he attained -- only to then have it ripped-off by Barry Bonds. I'm talking about the "Man of Steal."

    Name wise, where do these guys fall?

    Luis Ernesto (Montiel) Aparicio
    Orlando Manuel (Penne) Cepeda
    Martin Magdaleno Dihigo (Llanos) Dihigo
    Juan Antonio (Sanchez) Marichal
    Absolutely right about Rickey Nelson Henley Henderson. I stopped looking when I got to McCarthy...but you just killed the question.

    I resent Barry's BB record more than his HR record. Juiced or not, at least he had to actually hit the home runs. The walks were just a mockery.

    Not a Hall of Famer, but I have to put in a word for Calvin Coolidge Julius Caesar Tuskahoma McLish.
    A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.
    - Barry Manilow

  2. #1727
    Tends to be difficult JL25and3's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Poor old Tommy McCarthy.
    Yeah, it's not his fault. He wasn't a terrible baseball player, just a terrible Hall of Fame choice.
    A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.
    - Barry Manilow

  3. #1728
    Hughes/Robertson '12. groovitude's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by JL25and3 View Post
    You are Chuck Knoblauch, who first "appeared" in a hospital in Houston on July 7, 1968.

    Never mind the throwing. I was in the upper deck near first base for game 2 against the Indians, watching you argue with the ump while Enrique Wilson scooted around the bases. Moron.
    Way to go, JL23and3!

    Chuck Knoblauch is correct for #306.

  4. #1729
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Who am I? #307

    I won six events on the PGA tour. The great Bobby Jones thought a lot of my ball striking ability and Ben Hogan was taken by my ability to make pure contact on a regular basis. We often discussed the golf swing in depth by phone.

    Speaking of making contact, an earlier time comes to mind when I made pure contact during a baseball game. It would turn out to be the first time in baseball history that something like this would happen. It's so rare that history will tell you it has only happened twice in all the years of baseball. That's wrong information. Mine was the first and it has happened two other times since.

    What I did happened as a pinch hitter. Swift had taken a 3- 0 lead into the bottom of the ninth. We worked the bases full off him with nobody out after a pair of singles and a base on balls ... and our pitcher was due up. I went into the game as a pinch hitter and a relief pitcher came in to face me. The reliever delivered one pitch and lost the ball game. Making pure contact, hitting the ball squarely ... I hit a home run over the left field fence. My winning walk-off hit was a Grand Slam ... and the first ever made by a pinch hitter in a game where the winning team won with a home run when being down by three runs.

    Who am I?

  5. #1730
    NYYF Legend

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    Re: Who am I?

    You are Sammy Byrd
    Baseball is life;
    the rest is just details.

  6. #1731
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee Tripper View Post
    You are Sammy Byrd

    And ... you are right! Sammy Byrd, also known in baseballl, as ... "Babe Ruth's Legs."
    Last edited by Dave Visbeck; 01-11-11 at 06:05 PM.

  7. #1732
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    Re: Who am I?

    I'm shocked I got one so quickly but I stumbled on a youtube video of him with Hogan and the rest just fell into place.

    here is the link as if you don't already have it

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2XVoGQ9_6Q
    Baseball is life;
    the rest is just details.

  8. #1733
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee Tripper View Post
    I'm shocked I got one so quickly but I stumbled on a youtube video of him with Hogan and the rest just fell into place.

    here is the link as if you don't already have it

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2XVoGQ9_6Q
    Wow! Thanks for this. Had not seen it before. Perfect for the Who am I. Tripper ... are you a golfer? NCGA member?

  9. #1734
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Wow! Thanks for this. Had not seen it before. Perfect for the Who am I. Tripper ... are you a golfer? NCGA member?
    i figured you had seen it but if not would appreciate the Williams images, man he really did have a sweet swing.

    Golfer? Mini-golfer with the kids on occasion, I do like a good windmill or castle hole. As for real golf, less than 3 dozen times on the links and none in the past 15 years. I think my best score ever was a 108 with scores in the 120s not uncommon.
    Baseball is life;
    the rest is just details.

  10. #1735
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee Tripper View Post
    i figured you had seen it but if not would appreciate the Williams images, man he really did have a sweet swing.

    Golfer? Mini-golfer with the kids on occasion, I do like a good windmill or castle hole. As for real golf, less than 3 dozen times on the links and none in the past 15 years. I think my best score ever was a 108 with scores in the 120s not uncommon.

    Don't feel that bad about your golf game. When I played ... I had the worst swing in golf.

    Even Charles Barkley's swing looks closer to Sammy Byrd's -- when compared with my golf swing.

  11. #1736
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Who am I? #308


    My hitting as a major leaguer was the pits. I hold the record for having the most at-bats in a season without having had an extra base hit of any kind. No excuses for that. I can't even use the excuse that I was a pitcher.

    If I could of got past that power hitting prowess inability I had ... and could of upped my batting average some ... I think I could have made it in the major leagues. I could hold my own pretty darn good as a base runner - once I reached base, but that just didn't happen often enough by way of a base hit. I found myself walking to first base more often than reaching first base on any hits I made.

    A majority of my games were played behind the plate. Overall, I played in ninety games. I wasn't that bad of a defensive player. In a pinch I could play at other positions. With one team, I started at short for a couple of games. I think I did pretty well for a guy that usually caught games. I'll give you the stats, from my pair of games played at short, in a minute ... but first ... think of another Brooklyn born player that played at short. He handled 4.95 chances a game in his career and was involved in 1217 double plays in 1647 games. That's not even one double play a game ... and he wound up in the Hall-of-Fame! Now remember ... I'm usually a catcher. In the two games I played at short, I had 15 chances. I did make an error ... but also had 4 put-outs, had 10 assists, and help turn 5 double plays. Not bad for a guy that mostly caught games ... but could fill in at other positions, in a pinch!

    Oh well. It was my hitting that killed my major league baseball career. I am ... the pits.

    Who am I?

  12. #1737
    Tends to be difficult JL25and3's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Who am I? #308


    My hitting as a major leaguer was the pits. I hold the record for having the most at-bats in a season without having had an extra base hit of any kind. No excuses for that. I can't even use the excuse that I was a pitcher.

    If I could of got past that power hitting prowess inability I had ... and could of upped my batting average some ... I think I could have made it in the major leagues. I could hold my own pretty darn good as a base runner - once I reached base, but that just didn't happen often enough by way of a base hit. I found myself walking to first base more often than reaching first base on any hits I made.

    A majority of my games were played behind the plate. Overall, I played in ninety games. I wasn't that bad of a defensive player. In a pinch I could play at other positions. With one team, I started at short for a couple of games. I think I did pretty well for a guy that usually caught games. I'll give you the stats, from my pair of games played at short, in a minute ... but first ... think of another Brooklyn born player that played at short. He handled 4.95 chances a game in his career and was involved in 1217 double plays in 1647 games. That's not even one double play a game ... and he wound up in the Hall-of-Fame! Now remember ... I'm usually a catcher. In the two games I played at short, I had 15 chances. I did make an error ... but also had 4 put-outs, had 10 assists, and help turn 5 double plays. Not bad for a guy that mostly caught games ... but could fill in at other positions, in a pinch!

    Oh well. It was my hitting that killed my major league baseball career. I am ... the pits.

    Who am I?
    No, not the pits...the Pitz. Herman Pitz, that is - catcher, utility player and non-hitter extraordinaire for 90 games in 1890, split between the Brooklyn Gladiators and the Syracuse Stars of the American Association. I'll give you credit, you were able to work a walk - 58 off them in 346 PA, giving a career line of .165/.315/.165.

    Pretty impressive that you compiled better rate stats at shortstop than Phil Rizzuto did, considering that you were a catcher!
    A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.
    - Barry Manilow

  13. #1738
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by JL25and3 View Post
    No, not the pits...the Pitz. Herman Pitz, that is - catcher, utility player and non-hitter extraordinaire for 90 games in 1890, split between the Brooklyn Gladiators and the Syracuse Stars of the American Association. I'll give you credit, you were able to work a walk - 58 off them in 346 PA, giving a career line of .165/.315/.165.

    Pretty impressive that you compiled better rate stats at shortstop than Phil Rizzuto did, considering that you were a catcher!

    Very good, JL. It was the Pitz.

  14. #1739
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Who am I? #309


    In my more youthfull days, beginning at the age of twenty-one, I was a minor league bum. I was a man who ever gave promise of doing amazing feats only to fail time after time. I was an athlete who was kicked and buffeted around more energetically and mercilessly than any hurler known to baseball. I was a gypsy, roaming here and roaming there, always begging for a chance to prove myself—only to blow it again and again. I flung baseballs for 12 different ball clubs in eight different leagues through those ten years of travel, eight leagues when you include snaring brief tryouts with a couple of major league teams, including one of which being the Yankees.

    How did I do in that early youthful 10-year stretch? Why ... I was nothing better than a .500 pitcher ... and that mark took some doin' to make in the tenth year I pitched! With my athletic youth flitting from me, I was accorded a last chance to prove the right to call myself a pitcher. At the age of thirty, I suddenly steadied myself and went 21-11 ... thusly earning another major league chance in the following season.

    I was signed for a trifle more than a song. I would make $3000 that year. Before that season began, if anyone had predicted that this athlete, who could advance no higher than a $3000 salary after ten years of mostly minor league pitching ... a pitcher tipping the border line of age thirty, when athletes are presumed to be "almost done," would turn out to be worthy of taking some notice of future promise ... well ... I guess I surprised many a prophet. I took good advantage of that chance with a winning record on a losing club. I had the second best record on the team and I led the league in strikeouts.

    I made $5750 in the following year. Had a winning record on a losing club ... the second best record on the team again. Won another strikeout crown. Made $9000 in my third year -- a big year for me. Led the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts. The following year I signed a three-year deal worth $47500 ... not bad for a guy that turned thirty-four in the off season. I had a .580 winning percentage in the three years ... while the team went .415 when I didn't get a decision. At thirty-seven years of age, I signed a one-year contract for $20000. Responded by winning an ERA title, won the strikeout title again and tied for the league lead in shutouts. Led the team with 22 wins.

    Finally, after rising up from the ashes of a slipshod youth, at the age of thirty-eight, I signed a one-year deal that couldn't of made me happier. I became the highest salaried hurler of all time ... at $25000. I believe with all my heart that I had earned it. This season would turn out to be the best salaried year of my career.

    I would continue to pitch for some years to come. Some years would be good and some not so much, however, if you take a look ... I believe I finished my career in the top 10 for wins after reaching the age of thirty. I had made good after all ... and was a bum of a different kind.

    Who am I?
    Last edited by Dave Visbeck; 01-15-11 at 08:08 AM.

  15. #1740
    token White Sox fan
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Who am I? #309


    In my more youthfull days, beginning at the age of twenty-one, I was a minor league bum. I was a man who ever gave promise of doing amazing feats only to fail time after time. I was an athlete who was kicked and buffeted around more energetically and mercilessly than any hurler known to baseball. I was a gypsy, roaming here and roaming there, always begging for a chance to prove myself—only to blow it again and again. I flung baseballs for 12 different ball clubs in eight different leagues through those ten years of travel, eight leagues when you include snaring brief tryouts with a couple of major league teams, including one of which being the Yankees.

    How did I do in that early youthful 10-year stretch? Why ... I was nothing better than a .500 pitcher ... and that mark took some doin' to make in the tenth year I pitched! With my athletic youth flitting from me, I was accorded a last chance to prove the right to call myself a pitcher. At the age of thirty, I suddenly steadied myself and went 21-11 ... thusly earning another major league chance in the following season.

    I was signed for a trifle more than a song. I would make $3000 that year. Before that season began, if anyone had predicted that this athlete, who could advance no higher than a $3000 salary after ten years of mostly minor league pitching ... a pitcher tipping the border line of age thirty, when athletes are presumed to be "almost done," would turn out to be worthy of taking some notice of future promise ... well ... I guess I surprised many a prophet. I took good advantage of that chance with a winning record on a losing club. I had the second best record on the team and I led the league in strikeouts.

    I made $5750 in the following year. Had a winning record on a losing club ... the second best record on the team again. Won another strikeout crown. Made $9000 in my third year -- a big year for me. Led the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts. The following year I signed a three-year deal worth $47500 ... not bad for a guy that turned thirty-four in the off season. I had a .580 winning percentage in the three years ... while the team went .415 when I didn't get a decision. At thirty-seven years of age, I signed a one-year contract for $20000. Responded by winning an ERA title, won the strikeout title again and tied for the league lead in shutouts. Led the team with 22 wins.

    Finally, after rising up from the ashes of a slipshod youth, at the age of thirty-eight, I signed a one-year deal that couldn't of made me happier. I became the highest salaried hurler of all time ... at $25000. I believe with all my heart that I had earned it. This season would turn out to be the best salaried year of my career.

    I would continue to pitch for some years to come. Some years would be good and some not so much, however, if you take a look ... I believe I finished my career in the top 10 for wins after reaching the age of thirty. I had made good after all ... and was a bum of a different kind.

    Who am I?
    Are you Sal "The Barber" Maglie?

  16. #1741
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy John View Post
    Are you Sal "The Barber" Maglie?
    Nice guess, however ... the player we're looking for had fewer games pitched with the Yankees.

  17. #1742
    Tends to be difficult JL25and3's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Who am I? #309


    In my more youthfull days, beginning at the age of twenty-one, I was a minor league bum. I was a man who ever gave promise of doing amazing feats only to fail time after time. I was an athlete who was kicked and buffeted around more energetically and mercilessly than any hurler known to baseball. I was a gypsy, roaming here and roaming there, always begging for a chance to prove myself—only to blow it again and again. I flung baseballs for 12 different ball clubs in eight different leagues through those ten years of travel, eight leagues when you include snaring brief tryouts with a couple of major league teams, including one of which being the Yankees.

    How did I do in that early youthful 10-year stretch? Why ... I was nothing better than a .500 pitcher ... and that mark took some doin' to make in the tenth year I pitched! With my athletic youth flitting from me, I was accorded a last chance to prove the right to call myself a pitcher. At the age of thirty, I suddenly steadied myself and went 21-11 ... thusly earning another major league chance in the following season.

    I was signed for a trifle more than a song. I would make $3000 that year. Before that season began, if anyone had predicted that this athlete, who could advance no higher than a $3000 salary after ten years of mostly minor league pitching ... a pitcher tipping the border line of age thirty, when athletes are presumed to be "almost done," would turn out to be worthy of taking some notice of future promise ... well ... I guess I surprised many a prophet. I took good advantage of that chance with a winning record on a losing club. I had the second best record on the team and I led the league in strikeouts.

    I made $5750 in the following year. Had a winning record on a losing club ... the second best record on the team again. Won another strikeout crown. Made $9000 in my third year -- a big year for me. Led the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts. The following year I signed a three-year deal worth $47500 ... not bad for a guy that turned thirty-four in the off season. I had a .580 winning percentage in the three years ... while the team went .415 when I didn't get a decision. At thirty-seven years of age, I signed a one-year contract for $20000. Responded by winning an ERA title, won the strikeout title again and tied for the league lead in shutouts. Led the team with 22 wins.

    Finally, after rising up from the ashes of a slipshod youth, at the age of thirty-eight, I signed a one-year deal that couldn't of made me happier. I became the highest salaried hurler of all time ... at $25000. I believe with all my heart that I had earned it. This season would turn out to be the best salaried year of my career.

    I would continue to pitch for some years to come. Some years would be good and some not so much, however, if you take a look ... I believe I finished my career in the top 10 for wins after reaching the age of thirty. I had made good after all ... and was a bum of a different kind.

    Who am I?
    You are Charles Arthur "Dazzy" Vance, star pitcher for the Brooklyn Robins in the 1920s. Through age 30 - 1912-1921 - you pitched for York, Superior, Hastings, St. Joseph, Columbus, Memphis, Toledo, Rochester, Sacramento and New Orleans, going 133-129; you also managed to go 0-4, 4.91 in your brief stints with the Pirates and Yankees.

    And then you were suddenly a star, the best strikeout pitcher in the league. Over the next ten years you went 175-118, 3.08, while leading the league twice in wins, three times in ERA, and seven consecutive years in strikeouts. After a long tail end to your career, your final stats after age 30 were 197-136, 3.22. Not bad, considering your slow start...
    A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.
    - Barry Manilow

  18. #1743
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by JL25and3 View Post
    You are Charles Arthur "Dazzy" Vance, star pitcher for the Brooklyn Robins in the 1920s. Through age 30 - 1912-1921 - you pitched for York, Superior, Hastings, St. Joseph, Columbus, Memphis, Toledo, Rochester, Sacramento and New Orleans, going 133-129; you also managed to go 0-4, 4.91 in your brief stints with the Pirates and Yankees.

    And then you were suddenly a star, the best strikeout pitcher in the league. Over the next ten years you went 175-118, 3.08, while leading the league twice in wins, three times in ERA, and seven consecutive years in strikeouts. After a long tail end to your career, your final stats after age 30 were 197-136, 3.22. Not bad, considering your slow start...
    You are the man, once again, JL25and3!

    Only thing is that I haven't checked to see where he stands, against all others, in wins after reaching the age of 30. Someone will probably have the answer.

  19. #1744
    Tends to be difficult JL25and3's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    You are the man, once again, JL25and3!

    Only thing is that I haven't checked to see where he stands, against all others, in wins after reaching the age of 30. Someone will probably have the answer.
    For age 31 and up:

    1.Cy Young295
    2.Phil Niekro264
    3.Warren Spahn255
    4.Randy Johnson222
    5.Jamie Moyer221
    6.Gaylord Perry219
    7.Early Wynn199
    8.Eddie Plank197
    Dazzy Vance197
    10.Roger Clemens191
    A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.
    - Barry Manilow

  20. #1745
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    Re: Who am I?

    Thank you, JL25and3.

  21. #1746
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    Re: Who am I?

    Who am I? #310

    Want to tell you a little about a memorable game I had in a visiting city. It happened a day after having had my third full week in league play base ball. Our team captain, the leadoff hitter on our team and a native son of the city we were playing our game that day, was making his first appearance in this city as a player. It was in the first inning and as he came to bat, his local friends presented him with an elegant design in flowers, representing an accurately marked out diamond, and a floral bat. He smiled and waved his thanks and then set himself for business.

    We were facing one of this leagues newest and swiftest pitchers, a man that was averaging nearly a strikeout an inning and with four shutouts already under his belt in less than two months of play since leaving the National League to come play with this club. Our captain immediately fell behind with two strikes, and then to every one's astonishment, he drove the ball by the left fielder. This feat and the unexpected and touching tribute must have made him forgetful of the fact that all the bases must be touched ... and emulating the National League's swiftly moving George Gore, our captain, after touching first, skipped by second base and neglected third before heading home. Both the second baseman and the third baseman promptly claimed the out, and umpire Dutton, who saw the whole of our captain's act, allowed the claim for second base.

    Our captain then began a disgraceful amount of kicking, which only terminated when time for resuming play had expired. He informed the umpire that he would not play if the decision was persisted in, but Dutton was firm and would not budge on waving off our captain's claim for a home run.

    I was next to take the bat. If above wasn't memorable enough ... here is where a fond memory on my part begins. I made contact on a rapidly pitched ball that I hit to the third baseman and I made first on his error. I proceeded to steal second base and then stole third, and then successfully stole home while the ball was being returned from catcher to pitcher. My run was the only run we scored in the inning. They tied us in the bottom of inning one. Unfortunately, I opened the door for more runs scored by our opponent in the second inning ... ... and also beyond.

    It looked very much like rain in the fifth, and after rapidly disposing us in the top of the inning, our opponent allowed themselves to be put out in the bottom of the fifth. They had a big lead and it was rapidly growing dark, and at the beginning of the sixth inning the game was called, it being difficult to see the ball. My fond memory would be that I had stole three bases in one inning ... but ... having had played out of position, I had committed four errors while playing at short. Happily, I wouldn't play at short ever again.

    The game above was one of four games played against them in a series. I lost two of the games when pitching in starts - one where the same strikeout pitcher had thrown a shutout when pitching against me ... and I guess you can say I lost another against him with my glove.

    After finishing the four game series with the above team we had 19 games left in the season. I won 4 of my starts in the remaining games. One of the starts was against the same team we had earlier played ... and I beat a future HOF player in that start!

    Who am I?

  22. #1747
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Who am I? #310

    Want to tell you a little about a memorable game I had in a visiting city. It happened a day after having had my third full week in league play base ball. Our team captain, the leadoff hitter on our team and a native son of the city we were playing our game that day, was making his first appearance in this city as a player. It was in the first inning and as he came to bat, his local friends presented him with an elegant design in flowers, representing an accurately marked out diamond, and a floral bat. He smiled and waved his thanks and then set himself for business.

    We were facing one of this leagues newest and swiftest pitchers, a man that was averaging nearly a strikeout an inning and with four shutouts already under his belt in less than two months of play since leaving the National League to come play with this club. Our captain immediately fell behind with two strikes, and then to every one's astonishment, he drove the ball by the left fielder. This feat and the unexpected and touching tribute must have made him forgetful of the fact that all the bases must be touched ... and emulating the National League's swiftly moving George Gore, our captain, after touching first, skipped by second base and neglected third before heading home. Both the second baseman and the third baseman promptly claimed the out, and umpire Dutton, who saw the whole of our captain's act, allowed the claim for second base.

    Our captain then began a disgraceful amount of kicking, which only terminated when time for resuming play had expired. He informed the umpire that he would not play if the decision was persisted in, but Dutton was firm and would not budge on waving off our captain's claim for a home run.

    I was next to take the bat. If above wasn't memorable enough ... here is where a fond memory on my part begins. I made contact on a rapidly pitched ball that I hit to the third baseman and I made first on his error. I proceeded to steal second base and then stole third, and then successfully stole home while the ball was being returned from catcher to pitcher. My run was the only run we scored in the inning. They tied us in the bottom of inning one. Unfortunately, I opened the door for more runs scored by our opponent in the second inning ... ... and also beyond.

    It looked very much like rain in the fifth, and after rapidly disposing us in the top of the inning, our opponent allowed themselves to be put out in the bottom of the fifth. They had a big lead and it was rapidly growing dark, and at the beginning of the sixth inning the game was called, it being difficult to see the ball. My fond memory would be that I had stole three bases in one inning ... but ... having had played out of position, I had committed four errors while playing at short. Happily, I wouldn't play at short ever again.

    The game above was one of four games played against them in a series. I lost two of the games when pitching in starts - one where the same strikeout pitcher had thrown a shutout when pitching against me ... and I guess you can say I lost another against him with my glove.

    After finishing the four game series with the above team we had 19 games left in the season. I won 4 of my starts in the remaining games. One of the starts was against the same team we had earlier played ... and I beat a future HOF player in that start!

    Who am I?
    Rogers Hornsby would be the youngest to steal second-third-home - all in the same inning. Hornsby was a tad over twenty-one years and two months in age when he had his running feat. I (#310) would be the second youngest in age to do so, at twenty-one years and nine months ... on the rainy afternoon when I had my big base stealing day. Glad the game went official.

  23. #1748
    Released Outright Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Miss my Ryan, Kristin and Steve. Miss seeing my dad.

    Re: Who am I?

    Who am I? #311

    Number #310 said that Rogers Hornsby is the youngest to steal second, third, and home during the same inning of a game. I'll bet you won't guess who the oldest guy is that has done that. That happens to be me!

    Year the stolen bases happened was about the last time I ever led the league in anything, but for sure it wasn't my leading in stolen bases. Never did that in my long career. Stole those three bases in an inning in a year where I led the league in doubles. Did that more than a few times.

    Earlier part of my playing days I was a MVP. Way back in the beginning was a Rookie of the Year. Have won a few Gold Gloves along the way. Played on some winning World Series teams. Had a six game hitting streak in World Series play. Participated in a lot of All-Star games. Managed.

    Who am I?

  24. #1749

    Re: Who am I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck View Post
    Who am I? #311

    Number #310 said that Rogers Hornsby is the youngest to steal second, third, and home during the same inning of a game. I'll bet you won't guess who the oldest guy is that has done that. That happens to be me!

    Year the stolen bases happened was about the last time I ever led the league in anything, but for sure it wasn't my leading in stolen bases. Never did that in my long career. Stole those three bases in an inning in a year where I led the league in doubles. Did that more than a few times.

    Earlier part of my playing days I was a MVP. Way back in the beginning was a Rookie of the Year. Have won a few Gold Gloves along the way. Played on some winning World Series teams. Had a six game hitting streak in World Series play. Participated in a lot of All-Star games. Managed.

    Who am I?
    Carew and Lynn came to mind immediately but didn't have the doubles. It looks like Charlie Hustle did all that. SBs on 5/11/1980 (age 39).

  25. #1750

    Re: Who am I?

    Who am I? #312

    I was a Yankee pitcher and was born in Warren, OH.
    It ain't like football. You can't make up no trick plays. ~Yogi Berra
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