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  1. #1

    Life after minor leagues

    What do these players do when they hit their late 20s or early 30s? By this time, the probability of you making the majors is nearly impossible and you are hardly getting paid anything to support a family. How do these guys survive once baseball no longer wants them?
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  2. #2
    Very stable genius
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    Re: Life after minor leagues

    Quote Originally Posted by ppa79 View Post
    What do these players do when they hit their late 20s or early 30s? By this time, the probability of you making the majors is nearly impossible and you are hardly getting paid anything to support a family. How do these guys survive once baseball no longer wants them?
    Someone I went to college with was drafted and moved around from team to team for about five years. He then continued to play pro ball in Mexico until his claimed age of 40 (those on the team thought he took 4 years off his real age).
    my sanity is my biggest strength!

  3. #3
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    Re: Life after minor leagues

    Quote Originally Posted by ppa79 View Post
    What do these players do when they hit their late 20s or early 30s? By this time, the probability of you making the majors is nearly impossible and you are hardly getting paid anything to support a family. How do these guys survive once baseball no longer wants them?
    If they want to stay in baseball, they should have been preparing themselves for life after playing.

    Look at how many successful managers are former minor league players who never even sniffed the majors - Joe Maddon is a perfect example.
    Forgive me for taking the Contrarian view

  4. #4

    Re: Life after minor leagues

    Quote Originally Posted by longtimeyankeefan View Post
    If they want to stay in baseball, they should have been preparing themselves for life after playing.

    Look at how many successful managers are former minor league players who never even sniffed the majors - Joe Maddon is a perfect example.
    there are so few managerial positions and so many thousands of players who never make it to even those positions

    To address OP's question: Sugar (2003) is a great film and tells a narrative of what happens to immigrant ballplayers in particular who fail to adjust and can't make it to the majors.

    This is to say nothing of the low salaries that most minor leaguers are paid even while they're playing----typically lower than the federal minimum wage. This is a great article about it:
    http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/01/mino...t-kyle-johnson

    “The biggest challenge is that guys are very reluctant to upset the status quo,” Broshuis said. “My final year of playing, I talked to a number of guys about the possibility of unionizing. It was something we frequently talked about in the clubhouse. But guys were very reluctant to take that step, because they’re trying to reach the big leagues and they’re afraid of the repercussions.”
    the 1890's socialist Player's League, founded by workers:
    socialistappeal.org/history-theory/us-history/959-the-1890-players-league.html

  5. #5

    Re: Life after minor leagues

    Quote Originally Posted by SatchelPaigeYankee View Post
    there are so few managerial positions and so many thousands of players who never make it to even those positions

    To address OP's question: Sugar (2003) is a great film and tells a narrative of what happens to immigrant ballplayers in particular who fail to adjust and can't make it to the majors.

    This is to say nothing of the low salaries that most minor leaguers are paid even while they're playing----typically lower than the federal minimum wage. This is a great article about it:
    http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/01/mino...t-kyle-johnson

    My take away is from the article is that guys like Kyle Johnson would be cut immediately if teams had to pay 40-60k a year salary. The number of minor league teams would shrink. Teams aren't going to keep around a guy like Kyle Johnson if they need to pay him 40-60k and they think there is no potential.

    The problem is that Kyle Johnson needs to realize he is not good enough to play baseball in the majors and needs to find that 40-60k job in another profession. I think its kind of selfish of him to have his wife shoulder most of the burden of raising a child and supporting the family.

    Kyle Johnson wants to chase his dream but get paid to do that. Life doesn't work like that.
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  6. #6

    Re: Life after minor leagues

    Damn millenials!
    /sarcasm
    KayNOTForPresident

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