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  1. #26
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    Nome's Avatar
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    Branchburg, NJ 08876

    Re: Rememberances of times past

    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty one View Post
    Thanks for the memories, Andy. You made me think back to what I remember growing up in the 1950's. I think the string of Yankee World Series wins from 1949 to 1961 made me think that the Yanks were invincible. Each year my friends and I would look forward the picking out one Yankee each year to follow. For me I enjoyed watching Jerry Coleman because he played the position I played, second base and seemed to get clutch hits in the WS.
    I also enjoyed the debates that my Red Sox friends a I over who was the greater player, Joe DeMaggio or Ted Williams.
    I can't believe that at my age I still get very excited and anxious watching these latest Yankees in the playoffs. I hope I'm still around over the next several years to watch these kids develop into a new dynasty. Once the Yankees got into my blood in 1947, I have been a loyal fan. I also refuse to believe that football is the national pastime...to me it's still baseball.

    Al,


    why wouldn't you be around for the next several years and more to see these kids develop into another dynasty?
    I truly believe that some of the secrets to a long life is to be passionate about something, to be optimistic, and to look forward to the future and not the past. And from what I can tell from your posts you have those in abundance


    Take care


    Andy
    Last edited by Nome; 10-25-17 at 03:50 PM.
    Yogi is a National Treasure. Let's put him in a National Hall of Fame. The man has no peers.

  2. #27

    Re: Rememberances of times past

    Quote Originally Posted by Nome View Post
    I have always been a baseball fan from the time I can remember. I always will be. I accept the game that it is and I still love it.


    But I have to tell you how the game was when I was growing up. I was born in June 1938. Let me tell you about the 1950 season.. It consisted of two eight team leagues and a 154 game season. The Yankees in the AL and the Dodgers and Giants in the NL.


    The Yankees season opened on Tuesday April 18. The Yankees beat Boston 15-10 with Don Johnson with the win and Joe Page the save. Allie Reynolds started and only went three innings. Joe D and Dom DiMaggio played CF for the Yanks and Bosox respectively. The game went 3 hours and 28 minutes, the longest of the season. The first of only 11 games that the Yankees played all season that went over three hours.


    At that time all the games started at 3 PM. I don't know if they played any night games but I doubt it. The Yankees had a powerful lineup and frequently won the games in the late innings, most times with a HR thur the nickname "5 O'clock Lightning".


    At the time I was 12 and in the six grade of St Michaels Elementary School. I would rush home and put on our Philco radio and sit rapt listening to the game till it was over. That year the Yankees played 23 doubleheaders, nine on Sunday.


    The shortest game that they played that year lasted only one hour and 28 minutes. Eight games that year were under two hours. As you can imagine two were by Whitey Ford who came up late in the season finishing the season 9-1 before going into the army for two years.


    I spent most of that season listening to the games on the radio and then playing baseball every evening baseball with my buddies.

    The last game of the season was on September 28th. Tommy Byrne beat Mel Parnell of the BoSox.

    The Yankees went on to the WS where they beat the Phillies in 4 straight with Ford Beating a surprise starter in Jim Konstanty 1-0.


    The spring of 1951 was an exciting one with Mel Allen and Curt Gowdy extolling the virtues of a rookie phenom named Mickey Mantle who literally tore up Spring Training. He won the Jim Dawson award for the best rookie in the camp.


    I have great memories of that time period and I hope all of you have similar great memories of baseball in your youth.


    I will not get in a debate of when baseball was in its greatest years.
    I enjoyed my youth time experiences and I enjoy todays game. I look avidly to tonights game and to the next several years of what I expect to see another Yankee Dynasty.


    I have been, still an and will forever be a Yankee fan


    Warmest regards to all of you.


    Go Yankees


    Andy
    Nice post.

    I do think most tend to think the way the game was in their formative years (say 8 years old to 13 or 14), was 'the best'. I know you're not necessarily saying that...you pointed out this isn't something for debate.

    But I miss four divisions with 6 or 7 teams each. I enjoyed having, for the most part, two or three really good teams in each division battling all summer for one spot to go to the postseason. While I know the wildcard is never going away, I don't really like focusing on a certain number of wins as opposed to beating out your divisional rivals (although in recent years the premium has increased on the divison title, I'd still prefer the drama of a whole month of September pennant race to see if you will live another day after 162).

    AS a kid I remember the excitement of the 'Game of the Week'. Where I lived, I couldn't always get the Yankee games as I was 100 miles out of NYC and only occassionally would the signal be strong enough to really watch...so I'd hope against hope the NBC Game of the Week would feature the Yankees...it was like a mini holiday when it did.

    I'd listen to the radio broadcasts for probably 80% of the games....White, Scooter, Fran Healy, Messer (in those days they would rotate between radio and TV, with the exception of Fran Healy who would always remain on the radio side).

    I do think listening on the radio and hoping for a GAme of teh Week and/or good reception added something to the mystique of it all. Today everything is so accessible...hey, I wouldn't go back but there was something magical about when I DID get to sit there and watch a clear picture that can't be adequately described.

    Baseball can be tedious and frustrating and much of the game today I don't like...but it's still the sport that means the most to me....today I coach my young son and he is a total seamhead so far....I hope it continues....

  3. #28

    Re: Rememberances of times past

    Quote Originally Posted by Nome View Post
    I am almost ashamed to say this but we lived two blocks away from a cemetary. The grave markers were the flat kind just laying on top of the grass.
    We sometimes played our baseball there using appropriate markers as bases and home plate.


    Hey we were only 8-10 years old then. At least we kept the departed company


    Andy
    I was going to say, they probably enjoyed getting to watch some kids having fun playing baseball.
    Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get. ~ Dale Carnegie

  4. #29
    NYYF Legend

    Nome's Avatar
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    Branchburg, NJ 08876

    Re: Rememberances of times past

    Quote Originally Posted by YankeeFan1421 View Post
    Nice post.

    I do think most tend to think the way the game was in their formative years (say 8 years old to 13 or 14), was 'the best'. I know you're not necessarily saying that...you pointed out this isn't something for debate.

    But I miss four divisions with 6 or 7 teams each. I enjoyed having, for the most part, two or three really good teams in each division battling all summer for one spot to go to the postseason. While I know the wildcard is never going away, I don't really like focusing on a certain number of wins as opposed to beating out your divisional rivals (although in recent years the premium has increased on the divison title, I'd still prefer the drama of a whole month of September pennant race to see if you will live another day after 162).

    AS a kid I remember the excitement of the 'Game of the Week'. Where I lived, I couldn't always get the Yankee games as I was 100 miles out of NYC and only occassionally would the signal be strong enough to really watch...so I'd hope against hope the NBC Game of the Week would feature the Yankees...it was like a mini holiday when it did.

    I'd listen to the radio broadcasts for probably 80% of the games....White, Scooter, Fran Healy, Messer (in those days they would rotate between radio and TV, with the exception of Fran Healy who would always remain on the radio side).

    I do think listening on the radio and hoping for a GAme of teh Week and/or good reception added something to the mystique of it all. Today everything is so accessible...hey, I wouldn't go back but there was something magical about when I DID get to sit there and watch a clear picture that can't be adequately described.

    Baseball can be tedious and frustrating and much of the game today I don't like...but it's still the sport that means the most to me....today I coach my young son and he is a total seamhead so far....I hope it continues....


    There was something magical about listening to a game on the radio. That was my first exposure to baseball. Is is almost like the superiority to reading a book over seeing thew movie. Your imagination fills in the sights, sounds and smells of the experience.


    Yes we will always look to the game of baseball as we lived it in our youth, the game has changed and we have changed with it. I love baseball for the tremendous athletic ability it takes to make contact with the ball and to put it out of reach of the fielders; for the grace it takes to reach a batted ball and flawlessly execute that impossible play; for a first baseman to extend his body fully to snare that out of reach ball on a bounce and get it in his glove microseconds before the batter can get his spikes on the bag.


    Few people other than baseball fans can appreciate the skills it takes to excel in this game that we so passionately love


    Andy
    Yogi is a National Treasure. Let's put him in a National Hall of Fame. The man has no peers.

  5. #30
    NYYF Legend

    Sixty one's Avatar
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    Sep 2001
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    Re: Rememberances of times past

    Andy, You are right, I still truly enjoy this game. I DO intend to be around for many, many years to watch this new group of potential great Yankees develop. I especially enjoy Bird and Judge. Sanchez needs to develop better catching skills. Too bad they didn't keep Girardi...I thought he was a good manager.

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