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  1. #26
    NYYF Legend

    2JAY's Avatar
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    Feb 2001
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    Lexington Ky

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    Quote Originally Posted by ajra21 View Post
    simply put: i don't know. i'll ask my father the next chance i get. IIRC, he fought in africa for a short time too.

    he was a professional solider prior to the war with the british army. he only survived dunkirk because one of his good friends was 6'6" and therefore tall enough to keep my grandfather's head above water as they escaped the beach.
    I apologize for being nosy but I am always envious of other people and their military history as only one of my grandfathers served in WW 2 in the AAF but he was stationed in Brazil looking for UBoats in that region.
    During my several visits there, I have met numerous veterans from all nationalities and the one who I remember the most was from the British 6th Airborne and I met him near Ranville, near a small monument that was in memory of two transport planes that had crashed while delivering the paratroops. And he was supposed to be on one of those two planes but had been bumped by the need for extra radio equipment. I also think that the British cemeteries are some of the most poignant as the crosses list which unit they served with, their unit badge, and a small message from their families.

  2. #27
    time of my life ... ajra21's Avatar
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    Nov 2006
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    not as far from yankee stadium as i once was

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    Quote Originally Posted by 2JAY View Post
    I apologize for being nosy but I am always envious of other people and their military history as only one of my grandfathers served in WW 2 in the AAF but he was stationed in Brazil looking for UBoats in that region.

    During my several visits there, I have met numerous veterans from all nationalities and the one who I remember the most was from the British 6th Airborne and I met him near Ranville, near a small monument that was in memory of two transport planes that had crashed while delivering the paratroops. And he was supposed to be on one of those two planes but had been bumped by the need for extra radio equipment. I also think that the British cemeteries are some of the most poignant as the crosses list which unit they served with, their unit badge, and a small message from their families.
    no need to apologise. that grandfather died a couple of hours before i was born - in the same hospital - so we never met.

    my other grandfather was a bodyguard for the queen & the royal family for a significant section of the war.
    Bring tea for the Tillerman; Steak for the son; Wine for the woman
    who made the rain come; Seagulls sing your hearts away;
    'Cause while the sinners sin, the children play ...

  3. #28
    Get Off My Lawn. Maynerd's Avatar
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    May 2005
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    Colorado Springs

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    Now 75 years. I fear we'll have very few remaining anniversaries where we can recognize the surviving brave participants.

    Utah. Omaha. Gold. Juno. Sword.

    Here's a toast.....

    "But what people tend to forget...is that being a Yankee is as much about character as it is about performance; as much about who you are as what you do."
    - President Barack Obama

  4. #29

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    A Black Medic Saved Hundreds on D-Day. Was He Deprived of a Medal of Honor?

    https://www.history.com/news/d-day-h...&sf103698483=1

    Heavy machine-gun fire greeted a nauseous and bloody Waverly B. Woodson, Jr. as he disembarked onto Omaha Beach the morning of June 6, 1944. A German shell had just blasted apart his landing craft, killing the man next to him and peppering him with so much shrapnel that he initially believed he, too, was dying.

    Woodson, a medic with the lone African-American combat unit to fight on D-Day, nonetheless managed to set up a medical aid station and for the next 30 hours occupied himself removing bullets, dispensing blood plasma, cleaning wounds, resetting broken bones, and at one point amputating a foot. He also saved four men from drowning, reportedly pulling them from the waves and administering CPR after their guide rope broke on the way ashore.

    Having treated at least 200 men, Woodson finally collapsed from his injuries and was transferred to a hospital ship. Within days, however, he asked to return to Omaha Beach, the bloodiest of the five sites invaded by the Allies on D-Day. “He was a good man,” his widow, Joann Woodson, 90, tells HISTORY. “Whatever he set out to do, he made sure he was going to do it well.”
    Even Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, architect of the D-Day invasion and future president, weighed in, saying Woodson’s unit, the 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion, “carried out its mission with courage and determination, and proved an important element of the air defense team.”

    Woodson, however, never received the Medal of Honor, the highest U.S. military decoration given to those who display extraordinary valor in action. In fact, of the hundreds of Medals of Honor given out during World War II, not a single one went to a black soldier, even though more than 1 million African-Americans served in the conflict.
    I'll raise a glass to the Black heroes who didn't receive their due recognition because of systemic racism, then came home to a country that forced them into the back of the bus and prevented them from buying homes.

  5. #30

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    Much like with the Pearl Harbor survivors, there will be a void left when they have all passed.
    To the confusion of our enemies. 🍻

    Anyone that finds themselves in New Orleans with time on their hands should check out the National WWII Museum. It has one of the most extensive D-Day exhibits you could ever want to see and I have read that they have expanded it for this 75th anniversary. I went with the intent of staying a few yours, spent the better part of a day, and still didn't feel like I saw everything as completely as I would have liked.
    Take car. Go to Mum's. Kill Phil - "Sorry." - grab Liz, go to the Winchester, have a nice cold pint, and wait for all of this to blow over. How's that for a slice of fried gold?

  6. #31
    NYYF Legend

    theDurk's Avatar
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    Apr 2001
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    Basking Ridge, NJ

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    I visited the cemetery and Omaha Beach way back in 1973. On the beach, there were still concrete pillbox shells on the beach sliding down these great dunes, upended in their slow tumble towards sea level. I sat on one and tried to imagine jumping out of a plywood Higgins boat and climbing up that dune in the face of all that German firepower. I'll never forget it. Visit there if you get the chance. Their memory deserves it.
    "Deep to left! Yastrzemski will not get it! It's a home run! A three-run homer by Bucky Dent! And the Yankees now lead by a score of 3-2!" - New York Yankees announcer Bill White (October 2, 1978)

  7. #32

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    I've always loved this image. D-Day in the style of the Bayeux Tapestry. Genius.

    Take car. Go to Mum's. Kill Phil - "Sorry." - grab Liz, go to the Winchester, have a nice cold pint, and wait for all of this to blow over. How's that for a slice of fried gold?

  8. #33
    NYYF Legend

    Nome's Avatar
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    Feb 2000
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    Branchburg, NJ 08876

    Re: D-Day 73 years later

    My childhood friend, after HS went into the Army in 1956 and served in Germany. To make a long story short he has been living there with his German wife and two Doctor daughters for about40 years.
    On one of my visits there he took me to the American cemetary just outside of Luxembourg where many US dead from the Battle of the Bulge are buried in a huge semicircle around Patten. A very moving and humbling experience. Then he took me to a German cemetary just outside the German town of Bittburg. There were thousands of graves, all of German soldiers killed during that battle between Dec and Feb 1944. Most were between 18-22. I all but cried. What a waste of the young, even if they were Germans. They knew nothing of why the war was fought.


    My most moving experience was visiting Hiroshima and it's memorial. It was so moving I felt I was having a heart attack.


    That said I fully support the dropping of the bomb. It saved millions of lives on both sides.
    '
    Andy
    Yogi is a National Treasure. Let's put him in a National Hall of Fame. The man has no peers.

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