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Hitman23
09-23-03, 10:27 AM
Season Outlook

Hard as it is to believe, the Rangers will actually cut back on spending this year. Not that this represents a change in philosophy at Madison Square Garden, but the absence of Pavel Bure and Mike Richter from the lineup, and the reductions in salary taken by Brian Leetch and Mark Messier means that there are some extra dollars lying around somewhere.

Maybe they'll be used to get goaltender Curtis Joseph eventually, but in the meantime coach and GM Glen Sather has kept his hand on his pocket book as he prepares for what will be his most critical year in New York. The Rangers have missed the playoffs for six consecutive seasons, the last three on Sather's watch, and the natives, not to mention the suits upstairs, are beyond restless.

Sather knows that, which is one reason he has decided to remain behind the bench. He believes he has the magic to get talented individuals like Eric Lindros, Bobby Holik, Alexei Kovalev and the rest of a fantasy team-like lineup to blend into a successful group.

That remains to be seen. Sather spent more than he might of to get free-agent defenseman Greg deVries this summer, but re-acquired left wings Jan Hlavac, Martin Rucinsky and Chris Simon pretty cheaply. They'll help improve the team's weakest position last year, but the bigger issue is whether Sather can find the right combination of players and get them in proper roles.

Sather knows that no matter how good his team is on paper, they can't take a playoff appearance for granted. But he figures if the Rangers do get there, they could go all the way. Maybe.

http://www.sportsline.com/nhl/teams/page/NYR

Hitman23
09-23-03, 10:30 AM
Rangers Reassign Six Players
9/22/2003

29 Active Players Remain on New York Roster

New York Rangers President, General Manager and Head Coach Glen Sather announced today that the club has reassigned forwards Cory Larose, Lucas Lawson, Garth Murray and Jed Ortmeyer and defensemen John Jakopin and Craig Weller to the Hartford Wolf Pack of the American Hockey League (AHL). The Rangers now have 29 players remaining in training camp, including three goaltenders, 10 defensemen and 16 forwards. Goaltender Dan Blackburn remains inactive due to a left shoulder injury, while right wing Pavel Bure remains sidelined due to a knee injury. New York will continue its exhibition schedule on Wednesday, September 24 when the team travels to Columbus to face the Blue Jackets.

Players Remaining with the New York Rangers (NHL):

Goaltenders:
Mike Dunham, Jason LaBarbera and Jussi Markkanen.

Defense:
Greg de Vries, Darius Kasparaitis, Bryce Lampman, Brian Leetch, Vladimir Malakhov, Boris Mironov, Lawrence Nycholat, Tom Poti, Dale Purinton and Fedor Tjutin.

Forwards:
Matthew Barnaby, Anson Carter, Jan Hlavac, Bobby Holik, Alex Kovalev, Dan LaCouture, Eric Lindros, Jamie Lundmark, Mark Messier, Dominic Moore, Petr Nedved, Ronald Petrovicky, Martin Rucinsky, Richard Scott, Chris Simon and Juris Stals.

http://www.nyrangers.com/pressbox/pressreleases.asp?id=995

Hitman23
09-23-03, 10:32 AM
Give him the chance Sather. Please......


Lundmark more to prove

Bobby Holik enjoys having young, feisty Jamie Lundmark on his right side. But if Lundmark is going to stay there, he needs to pick up his play. A lackluster camp resulted in the team sending Lundmark a message by putting him on a line with Hartford-bound Garth Murray and Dominic Moore. Lundmark had eight goals in 55 NHL games last season, including just one in his last 25 contests. "...My mindset is that I have to prove that I belong in the NHL and that I have to make the team," Lundmark said in the New York Post Sept. 19. "I'm certainly not taking anything for granted." Holik hopes Lundmark stays put. "I've said many times that I enjoy playing with Jamie and that I think we're a good complement for one another," Holik said in the Post about his training camp roommate.

------------------------------------------------------------

"He has great skills, a great shot, very good speed and quickness, he understands how to get open in the offensive zone, and he plays the same give-and-go game that I do. ... He's very hungry for success here. I'm very impressed by how he's matured."
C Bobby Holik, in the New York Post Sept. 19, on the emergence of Jamie Lundmark, who's trying to earn a regular spot with the Blueshirts

JfromJersey
09-23-03, 12:35 PM
One thing I was happy to read was Sather mentioning that Holik's line would be matched with the opposition's top scoring line this season.

Rich
09-24-03, 12:26 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/24/sports/hockey/24rangers.html



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 24, 2003

<b><font size=4>Rangers Aim to Fix Power Play</font></b>

By JASON DIAMOS

GREENBURGH, N.Y., Sept. 23 - The one bright spot during the Rangers' first three preseason games was an experiment on the power play on Saturday night against Detroit.

Over the last four seasons, despite talent, the Rangers' power play has been dormant more often than not. Against the Red Wings, Coach Glen Sather decided to take a look at what Rangers fans have been pleading for the last several years: he put a big man in front of the opposing goaltender on the first power-play unit to create havoc.

Bobby Holik was chosen to play that role at the Palace at Auburn Hills. With Holik in front of the Detroit net and right wing Aleksei Kovalev manning one of the points - a role he has longed for since being reacquired from Pittsburgh last Feb. 10 - the Rangers' power play scored four goals in a 5-3 victory over Dominik Hasek.

It was the Rangers' only victory on the trip. On Wednesday night the Rangers open a home-and-home series with the Blue Jackets in Columbus, Ohio, that concludes Thursday night at Madison Square Garden.

"Basically, we were just moving and shooting the puck," Holik said of Saturday's power-play success. "There was not one single play we did twice."

Center Petr Nedved and defenseman Tom Poti each scored two goals. Kovalev had three assists, and left wing Jan Hlavac and Nedved were credited with two.

Although Holik did not score a point, Nedved said: "The key was Bobby was in front of the net. He ties up one or two guys at a time. He didn't let Hasek see a lot of the puck. And that was the reason we scored. That, and we moved the puck very well."

Sather said one reason he moved Kovalev off the point on the power play last season was that Kovalev, who appeared frustrated with the underachieving Rangers after the trade, kept trying to beat defenders one-on-one instead of passing the puck and moving to open ice.

Over the summer, while the Rangers were negotiating a new contract with Kovalev, one point the Kovalev camp brought up was his success in Pittsburgh on the point on the power play. If Saturday's game was any indication, that is where Kovalev will be when the Rangers open the season in Minnesota on Oct. 10.

As usual, the Rangers have said a quick start to the season is a key to earning their first playoff berth since the 1996-97 season. That season, the Rangers had the top-rated power play in the N.H.L. and advanced to the Eastern Conference finals.

The next two seasons, the Rangers' power play, thanks largely to the presence of Wayne Gretzky, ranked fifth and second, respectively, in the league. Gretzky retired after the 1998-99 season. The next season the Rangers scored only 9 goals in their first 112 power-play opportunities. According to figures provided by Elias Sports Bureau, the Rangers rallied to finish 10th in the 30-team league, with a 16.9 percent success rate. The next season, the team's power-play unit ranked 11th in the league at 17.9 percent.

In 2001-2, the Rangers' power play ranked 21st in the league at 14.7 percent, by far the team's lowest percentage since 1967-68, when the N.H.L. expanded from its original six teams. The Rangers opened last season nearly as poorly as they did in 1999-2000, converting only 13 of their first 111 power plays. The Rangers finished 15th in the league last season, at 16.2 percent.

SLAP SHOTS

Rangers defenseman Brian Leetch said Tuesday that his bruised left ankle was getting better. Leetch has been riding a stationary bicycle since the Rangers returned to their training center on Sept 16. "I think I'm ahead of the last time, for sure," said Leetch, who missed 31 games because of the same injury last season. Leetch was hurt Sept. 5, when he was hit accidentally by a Bobby Holik wrist shot during an impromptu workout session.

Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

ALR83
09-24-03, 02:49 AM
Originally posted by Hitman23
Give him the chance Sather. Please......

From your mouth to God's ears. And I'd actually like to see Moore make the team. What about you guys?


"He has great skills, a great shot, very good speed and quickness, he understands how to get open in the offensive zone, and he plays the same give-and-go game that I do. ... He's very hungry for success here. I'm very impressed by how he's matured."
C Bobby Holik, in the New York Post Sept. 19, on the emergence of Jamie Lundmark, who's trying to earn a regular spot with the Blueshirts

Bobby speaks SO highly of him, I really like that. I hope Sather takes that into consideration and doesn't bury him on the 4th line.


I don't want to get my hopes up too high, but I can't help it! I really think they're going to do well and they WILL make the playoffs!

Hitman23
09-24-03, 09:07 AM
Originally posted by Rich
Rangers Aim to Fix Power Play
it's about damn time. It was to the point where I was more scared of letting up a short-handed goal then actually scoring a PPG whenever they got the advantage. :lol:

We need Holik to be big this season.

Hitman23
09-24-03, 09:12 AM
Originally posted by ALR83
From your mouth to God's ears. And I'd actually like to see Moore make the team. What about you guys?
At this point, I'd rather them be bringing up these guys instead of buying any more players. And as of right now he is on the roster.

Originally posted by ALR83
Bobby speaks SO highly of him, I really like that. I hope Sather takes that into consideration and doesn't bury him on the 4th line. I think so much has been said and criticized, I'm thinking Sather is ready to try anything that might work. You put this kid up on a top line and get him a good amount of minutes a game, he's going to prove what he's worth. And playing with a superstar will only help him even more.

Originally posted by ALR83
I don't want to get my hopes up too high, but I can't help it! I really think they're going to do well and they WILL make the playoffs! I go into every season thinking that. And I will this year again. :)

LET'S GO RANGERS!!!

silverdsl
09-24-03, 10:16 AM
Originally posted by ALR83
I don't want to get my hopes up too high, but I can't help it! I really think they're going to do well and they WILL make the playoffs! That's what I hope for every season too but it just seems like things always go south so quickly. I really hope that this year will finally be the year that they return to the playoffs!

-Deborah

Hitman23
09-24-03, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by silverdsl
That's what I hope for every season too but it just seems like things always go south so quickly. I really hope that this year will finally be the year that they return to the playoffs!

-Deborah it's gets sad after a while, doesn't it? it's almost like we're turning into Sox fans. Wait till next year!! :lol:

Rich
09-27-03, 03:27 AM
http://www.nj.com/sports/ledger/index.ssf?/base/sports-0/1064641829293890.xml



<b><font size=3>Rangers know gutty Murray won't let pain stop his gain</b></font>

Saturday, September 27, 2003

BY BRIDGET WENTWORTH
Star-Ledger Staff

There were times last season when Richard Scott was hoping Garth Murray would just get off the ice and stay off the ice. There were times when Scott grew so tired of watching his Hartford Wolf Pack teammate wince through one excruciating stride after another that he actually told Murray to leave.

"He shouldn't have played. There is no way he should have been playing," Scott said. "I mean, there were some days where he could play, but there were other days that were just awful. In practice, it was really obvious. I told him a couple of times to get off."

Scott didn't know exactly what was wrong with Murray. Neither did Murray. All he knew was that he had pulled his groin during the Rangers' first preseason game in Montreal in September 2002, and despite a month off the ice to recover, something had continued to bother him and hamper his skating. Murray, just trying to get through his first year of professional hockey, continued to play in pain.

Today, Murray -- one of the Rangers' highly regarded forward prospects -- is back in Hartford, sent down early this week, but not before giving the Rangers another taste of his grit. His is a story of perseverance, a story of what young hockey players are willing to tolerate to play in the NHL. And while he waits for the call to return to the parent club, the scars on his abdomen will remind him of the sacrifices he already has made.

It was not until last April -- months after Murray felt the original pain -- that doctors in Philadelphia opened him up and found tears in the lower abdominal muscles on both sides of his torso and strains to the groin muscles on both sides, too. Murray's lower back and hip flexors also had been compromised. The injuries required a "pelvic floor repair" operation.

It's as gruesome as it sounds, although maybe not as troubling as the thought of someone playing 64 hockey games with those injuries.

"He had two tears in his abdominal muscles," Rangers coach and general manager Glen Sather said. "How he could play with one of them is beyond me."

A hellish daily ritual of cold-tub baths, electric stimulation and ice wraps begin to answer that question. There were ultrasound treatments during the season, at least one cortisone shot and constant monitoring by team trainers.

"Whenever I sneezed, it hurt. Whenever I slipped on the ice, it killed," Murray said. "Games were almost easier, because there's some flow and you get some speed going. But those first few strides, it really killed. Practices were tough, especially one-on-one (drills) down along the boards when you're trying to hit hard.

"There were some days when I could barely skate. My first few strides last year were basically about me just trying to get out of the way and then get speed going."

Sather wondered how Murray was able to play through his injuries -- others wondered why he bothered. The answer is simple: Murray, 21, was not honest with trainers and doctors when they asked how he was feeling. Murray wanted to remain visible in the organization that drafted him in the third round in 2001. Surgery would have meant the end of his season, and he wanted to keep playing.

"If I could do it all over again, I'd maybe look at a few more options," he said. "Maybe I should have let the trainers know more, maybe I should have told them that something was really bothering me. I tried to play through it."

Wolf Pack captain Ken Gernander, a career minor-leaguer, understood Murray's decision to keep going onto the ice every day.

"That window (of opportunity) is so small here as compared to other careers," Gernander said. "For a lot of people, there are so few chances that when you get that foot in the door, you hang on with everything you've got. Because once you are out, it can be an 'out of sight, out of mind' type of thing."

Sather refused to blame the organization's medical staff for failing to diagnose the true nature of the injury before surgery revealed it.

"There were lots of things (done), like MRIs, X-rays, and he was examined by half a dozen of our doctors," Sather said. "Still, how do you know? How do you know until somebody cuts into your skin to find out?"

Sather did not want to blame Murray, either. There is something about the young player's steadfast refusal to give in to the injury that appeals to Sather.

"He's a hard-nosed, junkyard kind of guy who skates well and handles the puck well," Sather said. "It will be interesting to see how he progresses."

A seven-week rest after surgery, followed by a summer of extensive rehabilitation and training, enabled Murray to report to training camp on Sept. 11 ready to play. He survived the first cuts and went with the Rangers on a three-game preseason trip before being sent down to Hartford on Monday.

During the trip, Murray earned one assist in two games but also took himself out of position often. A bad penalty during a loss on Sunday put him on the bench for a few shifts.

"I was a little surprised (to be sent down), to tell you the truth," he said. "But I know they want me to get into a bunch of games down here. I'm still coming back from injury."

Murray was a long shot to make the team straight out of the preseason, and he could use a season in the minors at full health. His goal is to make the list of players called up if injuries hit the Rangers.

If he makes the NHL, it will be as a grinding forward, a player that goes into the corners to do the dirty work and doesn't mind throwing his weight around. Early in the Rangers' five-day camp in Vermont, Murray was still getting his skating rhythm down, but did not hesitate to go for big hits and stand up for his teammates.

During the intrasquad scrimmage that signaled the end of camp, big defenseman John Jakopin took a run at Jamie Lundmark, Murray's linemate. Murray, 6-1 and 207 pounds, immediately took on the 6-5, 232-pound Jakopin in a fight and paid for it when the defenseman landed an overhand right that opened cuts above and next to Murray's left eye. Ten minutes later, with four stitches holding his wounds closed and the skin around his eye rapidly swelling and bruising, Murray returned to finish the game.

A couple of days earlier, when Rangers bruiser Chris Simon went at him for a hit in open ice during a scrimmage and nailed him in the midsection -- the area that was so damaged last year -- Murray hesitated, then skated away without a problem.

"I pride myself on playing strong, playing through pain, all of that. And if that helped my standing, maybe that's the plus side of (the injury)," Murray said. "I guess I did show that I can play through pain, and that's important as well."

Even those competing with Murray for a roster spot admired him.

"Minor-league guys always want to make it up, and if a guy gets called up, you're kind of sour, you feel slighted," Gernander said. "But Garth is the kind of guy that everybody's going to pull for. For a whole season, he stuck up for this guy and that guy and he played hard. Everybody's gained a lot of respect for him, and they're going to pull for him if he gets his chance.

Copyright 2003 The Star-Ledger

ALR83
09-28-03, 04:50 PM
Unbelievable. That's pure heart right there.

Glad we have someone like him in the organization.

Rich
09-29-03, 02:24 AM
http://www.nj.com/sports/ledger/index.ssf?/base/sports-0/1064812359246790.xml



<b><font size=3>Rangers: Sharp effort has Messier tootin' horn for Tutin</b></font>

Monday, September 29, 2003

BY BRIDGET WENTWORTH
Star-Ledger Staff

NEW YORK -- After a quiet training camp and preseason, Rangers defense prospect Fedor Tutin finally gave a glimpse of the team's future on the blue line, and it was pretty impressive.

Tutin, 20, picked up a goal in the Rangers' 4-1 victory over the Boston Bruins at Madison Square Garden last night after earning a call-up from minor-league Hartford yesterday. Tutin's game was solid if unnoticeable until halfway through the second period, when he started throwing his weight around and single-handedly produced the scoring chance that led to his goal.

Tutin, with confidence, took the puck from the point down to the endboards behind Andrew Raycroft's net, and proceeded to outwork the Bruins to maintain control of it. He then came around to the right post for several whacks at the loose puck before sending it over Raycroft and into the net for his first goal of the preseason.

"I thought Tutin was the best player on the ice tonight," said captain Mark Messier, who also picked up a goal. "He played with a lot of confidence, he moved the puck around well and went back into his own zone to get the puck with forecheck pressure on him. He found the open man, he shot the puck well, he pinched in and he created a goal."

Tutin, who spent last season playing for two different teams in the Russian Hockey League, is only now getting comfortable with the English language and with the transition to North American-style hockey. And not until the game against Boston did Tutin have any real reason to discuss his play with the Rangers through this preseason. Asked to rate his play through September, Tutin hesitated, unsure how to express himself.

"Not really good. Not great," he said. "Last year, I played in Russia, so everything is different now. Everything takes time."

Tutin has appeared in three of the Rangers' first six preseason games, and his goal against the Bruins was his first point in those games. He was nervous the first time he played in an NHL game, which he figures affected his overall play.

"The first game, I didn't want to do any mistakes," Tutin said. "But all of my teammates helped me and talked to me, and I just tried to play better every game."

Tutin added that fellow Russian defensemen Vladimir Malakhov and Boris Mironov have been especially helpful on the ice and on the bench with advice and instruction. Head coach Glen Sather sees Tutin coming around but also sees certain areas for him to work on.

"He needs experience. He needs to be more alert around the puck sometimes," Sather said. "But he's going to be fine."

There is no set timetable for Tutin to join the Rangers. A year in the minors with Hartford, with perhaps a call-up here or there, is the likely scenario.

"When guys get a chance to play in a game (in the NHL) or plays well at the American Hockey League level, they're the ones who give us the indication they're ready to play at this level," Sather said. "There is no scale out there that says a guy is two weeks away (from the NHL), or a month away, or five years away.

"He makes his own breaks in this game. When they're ready to play, when they jump in and play well, that's when you know a guy can play."

Notes:

Defenseman Tom Poti (neck spasms) said he is feeling better and would probably be able to practice today if the Rangers did not have the day off for their annual golf outing. Poti will not participate in the outing but will likely practice tomorrow.

ALR83
09-29-03, 05:44 PM
First of all I was like a raving lunatic last night because I couldn't see this game. Then HE has to go and play so well and it pissed me off even more that I couldn't see it! I won't even say the things I wished on Dolan...bad bad bad.

Anyway, this is really exciting. I hope this gives him a big boost of confidence, especially seeing Mess rave about him, and he gives them no choice but to put him on the team. I just wonder what happened. He didn't have a good camp from what we've read, he gets sent down, called back up and then all of a sudden he's the star of the game. I can't figure that out, but I'm not complaining lol. Good for him. :)

Rich
09-29-03, 11:18 PM
Originally posted by ALR83
First of all I was like a raving lunatic last night because I couldn't see this game. Then HE has to go and play so well and it pissed me off even more that I couldn't see it! I won't even say the things I wished on Dolan...bad bad bad.

Anyway, this is really exciting. I hope this gives him a big boost of confidence, especially seeing Mess rave about him, and he gives them no choice but to put him on the team. I just wonder what happened. He didn't have a good camp from what we've read, he gets sent down, called back up and then all of a sudden he's the star of the game. I can't figure that out, but I'm not complaining lol. Good for him. :)

I just think it's hard for any young player (and hockey players are often really young) to gain the confidence to relax and let their talent takeover. When the player is a foreigner, it must even more difficult, given the cultural and language differences.

Dolan is the worst owner in sports.

JfromJersey
10-02-03, 12:17 PM
Originally posted by Rich


I just think it's hard for any young player (and hockey players are often really young) to gain the confidence to relax and let their talent takeover. When the player is a foreigner, it must even more difficult, given the cultural and language differences.

Dolan is the worst owner in sports.

Speaking of Dolan..here is an article from Larry Brooks today in the Post:
http://www.nypost.com/sports/rangers/3517.htm

If you don't demand success..you'll seldom get it.
Another long season in store for us Ranger fans.

Hitman23
10-02-03, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by JfromJersey
Another long season in store for us Ranger fans. yeah I've come to accept that. Although I tend to believe if they miss the playoffs again Sather might be fired anyway. I've heard this song and dance before.

ALR83
10-02-03, 06:23 PM
Originally posted by Rich
Dolan is the worst owner in sports.

More proof of this...


Originally said by The Dumbest Person Alive
"I have to believe that Glen and his group will produce a winner for us, not only for one season but as long as it's built for."

"My reasons [for having confidence in Sather] don't go away because of Ws and Ls," he said. "There's a lot more to it than that. If for some reason we don't [have a good record], that does not change my confidence in Glen as a manager."

So, anyone know when this team expires? Because apparently there is a date when it's just over. And normally when someone doesn't do their job they get fired. Oh, right, this is MSG.

Why do we have to put up with this jackass?

JfromJersey
10-02-03, 06:46 PM
Originally posted by ALR83


More proof of this...



So, anyone know when this team expires? Because apparently there is a date when it's just over. And normally when someone doesn't do their job they get fired. Oh, right, this is MSG.

Why do we have to put up with this jackass?

We don't have to. We can all become Devils fans.
Seriously..when people stop coming to Ranger and Knick games in droves, and Dolan actually starts losing a significant sum of money, maybe then he will actually start to put his foot down.. or, better yet..sell the team. What baffles me..is the league knows that a good Ranger team is good for the sport in general, yet they just sit there and watch the Rangers disintegrate every year. Bettman should give both Sather and Dolan a swift kick in the behind, and tell them..enough with giving the NHL such a lousy team, year after year, in the media capital of the world.

ALR83
10-03-03, 01:41 AM
Originally posted by JfromJersey
We don't have to. We can all become Devils fans.
Seriously..when people stop coming to Ranger and Knick games in droves, and Dolan actually starts losing a significant sum of money, maybe then he will actually start to put his foot down.. or, better yet..sell the team. What baffles me..is the league knows that a good Ranger team is good for the sport in general, yet they just sit there and watch the Rangers disintegrate every year. Bettman should give both Sather and Dolan a swift kick in the behind, and tell them..enough with giving the NHL such a lousy team, year after year, in the media capital of the world.

I'd rather die then become a Devils fan.

Ranger fans are loyal as hell, if they didn't stop going the past 6 years with the team as bad as it was, they're not going to stop now. And it stinks (cannot believe s*cks is blocked :lol: ) because even though it would look bad not showing up, in the end it could turn out to be the best thing.

HE HAS TO SELL THIS TEAM! :mad:

Rich
10-03-03, 04:04 PM
http://nyrangers.com/



<b>BLUESHIRTS CLAIM THREE, LOSE THREE IN NHL WAIVER DRAFT<b>
The Rangers announced Friday that they claimed forwards Sheldon Keefe (Tampa Bay) and Mike Siklenka (Philadelphia) along with former Blueshirt defenseman Joel Bouchard (Buffalo) in the NHL Waiver Draft. The Atlanta Thrashers claimed winger Ronald Petrovicky and recently-claimed defenseman Shawn Heins, while forward Jeff Heerema was taken by St. Louis.

JfromJersey
10-04-03, 01:09 PM
Originally posted by ALR83


I'd rather die then become a Devils fan.

Ranger fans are loyal as hell, if they didn't stop going the past 6 years with the team as bad as it was, they're not going to stop now. And it stinks (cannot believe s*cks is blocked :lol: ) because even though it would look bad not showing up, in the end it could turn out to be the best thing.

HE HAS TO SELL THIS TEAM! :mad:

I guess people would rather see bad hockey, than no hockey at all. I remember in 1978, shortly after the infamous "Fumble Game", when the football Giants were really pitiful, someone flew a small plane over Giants stadium that carried a banner that read "15 Years of Lousy Football". The next season, they hired George Young to manage the team. The Rangers fans at the Garden need to pull of a similar stunt.

Rich
10-04-03, 02:36 PM
Originally posted by JfromJersey


I guess people would rather see bad hockey, than no hockey at all. I remember in 1978, shortly after the infamous "Fumble Game", when the football Giants were really pitiful, someone flew a small plane over Giants stadium that carried a banner that read "15 Years of Lousy Football". The next season, they hired George Young to manage the team. The Rangers fans at the Garden need to pull of a similar stunt.

The ownership situation of the Rangers is totally different. In 1978, Wellington and Tim Mara couldn't agree on whom to hire, so Pete Rozelle had to step in, and Young was more or less forced on them as a compromise choice. The Dolans are free to run this franchise, and the Knicks, into the ground.

ALR83
10-04-03, 10:53 PM
Originally posted by Rich
The Dolans are free to run this franchise, and the Knicks, into the ground.

And that is one thing they are doing successfully. :o

Rich
10-10-03, 01:49 AM
http://www.nj.com/sports/ledger/index.ssf?/base/sports-0/1065764324131070.xml



<b><font size=3>Rangers: Rejuvenated Lindros once again a hit on ice</b></font>

Friday, October 10, 2003

BY BRIDGET WENTWORTH
Star-Ledger Staff

Last week, during the Rangers' 4-2 loss to the Devils in a preseason game at Madison Square Garden, there were moments when Eric Lindros was both the player he used to be and the player he hopes to become.

Bang! Down goes Brian Rafalski, who moments earlier had jumped on Lindros following a healthy shot by the Rangers' center on Martin Brodeur's pads.

Smash! Grant Marshall gets pasted by Lindros as a buzz begins to ripple through the Garden crowd.

Slam! It's Mike Rupp's turn to feel Lindros' wrath. When Rupp goes down, Lindros skates away and fans jump to their feet. They cheer and scream and clap and shake their fists in a show of support for the player many of them never wanted to see in a Rangers uniform. This one shift by Lindros seems to unleash a wave of hope in a building that has had no reason to hope for much lately, and you can almost hear the thoughts out loud:

Lindros looks tough and ready to battle. He's got his mean streak back, he's got his hitting game back, he's got his stick up.

So, with one season of good health behind him, is Lindros primed to be a force again in the NHL?

"Oh, I plan on it. I plan on it, for sure," Lindros said. "And I don't see a reason why it doesn't happen."

The Rangers open their season tonight against the Wild in Minnesota, and Lindros is preparing to quit the role of perimeter player he had morphed into in recent seasons. Injuries, especially a series of concussions, had left him wary on the ice. His play, once a scary combination of talent and meanness, had deteriorated. He played 81 games last year, the most of his NHL career, but was a non-factor on many nights, picking up just 19 goals and 34 assists.

"I noticed little rats on the ice taking cheap shots at him," teammate Anson Carter said. "People got the feeling he wouldn't drop the gloves anymore, he wouldn't back it up."

Not with the specter of seven concussions hanging over him.

"I think there were some liberties taken, and I was caught in a Catch-22, not so much in being reluctant to fight but understanding there was a risk to it," Lindros said. "Before, because of the concussions, (players) would think twice about what (they) would do (to me) in a particular situation. There was fear ... no, I don't want to use the word fear. It was just people being partly on eggshells as to whether they wanted to do it or not.

"And last year, there weren't many eggshells."

Lindros is comfortable enough with his health to play on the edge once again and stay there, and the Rangers are willing to back him up. Lindros was called for elbowing for the hit on Stevens -- so be it.

"I keep telling him that we're going to kill those penalties, because he has to be a presence around the ice," Carter said. "My job as I see it is to constantly positively reinforce what's going on. I've got to stay on him, and I do stay on him. I might be annoying him but I don't care. I let him know that, hey, things are happening out there and things are paying off as the result of him being a mean and grumpy man. If you're going to take a penalty being mean and aggressive out there, so be it."

Matthew Barnaby is also willing to be a bug in Lindros' ear. Barnaby and Lindros have become close friends, this after years of Barnaby cultivating a white-hot hatred for Lindros while playing against his Philadelphia Flyers for various Eastern Conference teams.

"I want every team to hate him as much as I hated him," Barnaby said. "The biggest compliment anyone can pay a person is that he's hard to play against. That's the kind of player Eric is. I go back to those shifts in the Garden, when he starts hitting and knocking guys down and playing aggressive. There is absolutely no one in this league who can stop him when he plays that way, and it's up to us to reiterate that to him."

Lindros will not be looking for a fight when he hits the ice. He knows one more knock to the head could end his career.

"I'm not about to sign a waiver and go play without a helmet," he joked. "And diving headfirst in front of shots is something you'd want to avoid."

But a return to a hard-driving, physical, punishing style is not out of the question.

"I feel good and I feel confident about the year, I feel strong mentally and physically," he said. "My comfort level is excellent out there."

Flaz
10-10-03, 04:56 PM
The big bad E-Train is back. Just watch.

Tonight's gonna be a tough test as the Wild are one of the better teams defensively and committed to everything they do.

LET'S GO RANGERS!

bakntime
10-10-03, 05:07 PM
Originally posted by Flaz
The big bad E-Train is back. Just watch.

Tonight's gonna be a tough test as the Wild are one of the better teams defensively and committed to everything they do.

LET'S GO RANGERS!

My instincts always get me all excited for the Rangers season, but then my better judgement kicks in and I get all pessimistic.

GO BLUE SHIRTS!

Hitman23
10-10-03, 05:11 PM
LET'S GO RANGERS!!!!

YanksRockMan
10-10-03, 08:55 PM
Originally posted by Hitman23
LETS GO FLYERS!!!!! ORANGE AND BLACK!!!
damn steve..never think you'd switch sides ;)

ALR83
10-11-03, 03:33 AM
Originally posted by YanksRockMan

darn steve..never think you'd switch sides ;)

DON'T YOU START!!!!!


*sigh* I have nothing to say about that game tonight.

BTW, Tjutin scored twice in the Pack game tonight. :badass:

wexy
10-11-03, 04:55 PM
A fine start last night for the Rangers turning a 3-1 lead into a 5-3 loss.

ALR83
10-11-03, 09:42 PM
Another BEAUTY by them tonight. :barf: