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NetShrine.com
08-10-01, 11:17 PM
Who are your Top 10 All-Time Yankee SP, in order? Here's mine

1 Whitey Ford
2 Red Ruffing
3 Lefty Gomez
4 Ron Guidry
5 Bob Shawkey
6 Mel Stottlemyre
7 Waite Hoyt
8 Herb Pennock
9 Jack Chesbro
10 Fritz Peterson

Jimbo
08-10-01, 11:49 PM
Here goes...

1.Ron Guidry
2. Catfish Hunter
3. Whitey Ford
4. Vic Raschi
5. Allie Reynolds
6. Dave Righetti (Remember July 4, 1983???)
7. Roger Clemens
8. Don Larsen
9. Orlando Hernandez
10. Rudy May (Why not?!)

Slippery Elm
08-10-01, 11:53 PM
Bob Shawkey was not better than HoFer Waite Hoyt, who should be in the top five or six.

You can throw Carl Mays in the mix, possibly.

Don Larsen? I assume that was meant to be facetious?

Gator
08-10-01, 11:59 PM
Where do Spud Chandler, Ed Lopat, and Allie Reynolds fit in?

And I'd wager in 5 years, Pettitte will be on that list too.

Slippery Elm
08-11-01, 12:46 AM
I'd rate Pettitte easily over Fritz Peterson right now.

Jimbo
08-11-01, 02:08 AM
My number one fav...

Jimbo
08-11-01, 02:09 AM
Number two on my all-time fav list...

Jimbo
08-11-01, 02:11 AM
Number three all-time fav...Whitey Ford.

NetShrine.com
08-11-01, 11:23 AM
Originally posted by Slippery Elm
I'd rate Pettitte easily over Fritz Peterson right now.

In hindsight, I'd go that way too.

NetShrine.com
08-11-01, 11:30 AM
Originally posted by Slippery Elm
Bob Shawkey was not better than HoFer Waite Hoyt, who should be in the top five or six.

As a Yankee, Shawkey had 168 wins and an ERA of 3.12.

As a Yankee, Hoyt had 157 wins and an ERA of 3.48.

You make the call.

SkooterPhil#10
08-11-01, 12:42 PM
Roger Clemens should be near the top of every list. Think of all the things pitchers now have to contend with: lower mound, stronger hitters, smaller parks, a tighter ball, etc. Roger belongs at the number two spot for sure.

NetShrine.com
08-11-01, 02:08 PM
Originally posted by SkooterPhil#10
Roger Clemens should be near the top of every list. Think of all the things pitchers now have to contend with: lower mound, stronger hitters, smaller parks, a tighter ball, etc. Roger belongs at the number two spot for sure.

All-time, yes. All-Yankee? He needs at least two more years, IMHO.

emptynets
08-11-01, 05:16 PM
What about Melido Perez!! LOL! What ever happened to him?

#1PaFan
08-11-01, 06:46 PM
What? No Ed Whitson? :lol:

Slippery Elm
08-11-01, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by #1PaFan
What? No Ed Whitson? :lol:

He may have been reincarnated in the form of Jay Witasick!

Funny about Whitson, he had enough guts to use his judo/karate crap on Billy Martin in a bar fight, but didn't have the guts to pitch in the Bronx. I remember once a van load of angry Yankee fans following his car after a game. Scared Whitson even more! :evil:

Bernie51
08-12-01, 09:43 AM
No Kenny Rogers?!

Just kidding. :P

SkooterPhil#10
08-12-01, 02:22 PM
Originally posted by NetShrine.com


All-time, yes. All-Yankee? He needs at least two more years, IMHO.


Oh... I thought it was the best ever to put on the pinstripes...

Patrick Walden
08-12-01, 10:59 PM
He only pitched 6 years with the Yanks but I have to add Urban Shocker to the list. Pitched the 1927 knowing he was terminally ill and still won 18 games! That's got to worth something.

NetShrine.com
08-12-01, 11:29 PM
Originally posted by Patrick Walden
He only pitched 6 years with the Yanks but I have to add Urban Shocker to the list. Pitched the 1927 knowing he was terminally ill and still won 18 games! That's got to worth something.

For those who don't know about Shocker:
http://bw.sportsline.com/u/baseball/bol/ballplayers/S/Shocker_Urban.html

Shocker is a dim figure, an unappreciated, almost-forgotten great pitcher. In a 13-year career, he never had a losing season and compiled a .617 winning percentage. He was well-enough known in his time, yet he labored in relative obscurity. His best years were spent with the Sisler-era Browns, a so-so team that had the bad luck to be good when the Yankees were fantastic. His final years were spent as a Yankee, but as perhaps the least flamboyant of that vivid ensemble. And he died at the untimely age of 38, much too early to have become a legend.

Shocker came late to the big leagues and did not even become a pitcher until 1913, his first professional season. Originally a catcher, he demonstrated such speed and accuracy in his throws that he was switched to the mound. He acquired a spitter, which he threw infrequently and as a breaking slow ball, and a variety of curves. His delivery was aided by a permanent crook in the end joint of his ring finger, suffered when he speared a ball while still a catcher. He always said the crooked finger improved his grip and thus the effectiveness of his pitches.

Two fine seasons with Ottawa, of the Canada League, brought him to the Yankees in 1916 for $750. In one of Miller Huggins's rare misjudgments, however, he was traded to the Browns in 1918, with Les Nunamaker, Fritz Maisel, Nick Cullop, and Joe Gedeon, for Del Pratt, Eddie Plank, and $15,000.

Thereafter, Shocker hit his stride, stringing together four 20-win seasons and proving a particular nemesis of the Yankees. In 1924 the Yanks stole him back for Joe Bush, Milt Gaston, and Joe Giard. Shocker had his only .500 season in 1925, the year of the great Yankee slump, but pitched marvelously well in 1926 and 1927.

After the 1927 season he voluntarily retired (he did pitch three innings in 1928). He had a successful radio shop in St. Louis, but evidently was too ill to run it. His death was attributed to an overstrained "athlete's heart."

Shocker was an intense, unsmiling fellow, a studious pitcher widely admired for an artful delivery and a profound knowledge of hitters. He allowed almost exactly a hit per inning, yet, as his ERA shows, not many runs. He was stingy with walks, averaging one every four innings. A serious professional, he was known as an excellent fielder and capable hitter, perhaps too serious to have a nickname.

Nome
08-13-01, 09:24 AM
I am not going to try to put these in order, and thank god you limited it to starting pitchers otherwise the task would be far more difficult.

Ford
Chesbro
Guidry
Hoyt
Reynolds
Raschi
Lopat
Chandler
Shawky
Pennock
Ruffing


Damn, that's 11 and I'm not through yet. Oh well those will have to do for now.

As far as relief pitchers are concerned, in no particular order;

Murphy
Page
Arroyo
Duren
Gossage
Rags
Mo
Whettland
Lyle

koko
08-13-01, 12:18 PM
I'm surprised Pettitte hasn't made more lists. The guy's going to be in the HoF one day.

Here's mine:

Ford
Guidry
Chesbro
Pettitte
Hoyt
Hunter
Reynolds
Raschi
Lopat
Pennock

thaa
10-27-10, 03:40 PM
I was looking through this old thread. How odd that no one mentioned Lefty Gomez. Anyway, my list, in no particular order.

1. Pennock
2. Ruffing
3. Gomez
4. Hoyt
5. Raschi
6. Reynolds
7. Lopat (good enough for Ted Williams, good enough for me)
8. Ford
9. Guidry
10. Pettitte

HelloNewman
10-27-10, 04:54 PM
How odd that no one mentioned Lefty Gomez.It's amazing, just in my lifetime, Gomez has gone from overrated to underrated to virtually forgotten. Forty years ago he was on everyone's list of Yankee greats.

A highly unscientific stab at it:

1. Ford
2. Ruffing
3. Gomez
4. Guidry
5. Pennock
6. Pettitte
7. Cone
8. Reynolds
9. Lopat
10. Mussina

Yankee Tripper
10-27-10, 05:36 PM
It's amazing, just in my lifetime, Gomez has gone from overrated to underrated to virtually forgotten. Forty years ago he was on everyone's list of Yankee greats.

I may take a stab myself but yeah Gomez is one that thought would have been top 5 easy. Just checked his stats which are quite nice but his post season line is almost dare I say Cliff Leeesqe? 7 starts - 6-0, 2.86 ERA, 4 GCs, 5 world series rings in 5 tries. Not too shabby.

HelloNewman
10-27-10, 06:06 PM
I may take a stab myself but yeah Gomez is one that thought would have been top 5 easy. Just checked his stats which are quite nice but his post season line is almost dare I say Cliff Leeesqe? 7 starts - 6-0, 2.86 ERA, 4 GCs, 5 world series rings in 5 tries. Not too shabby.Could be inconsistent from year-to-year and burned out early (last great year at age 28, last good year at 30, last decent year at 32) but when he was good he was REALLLLLLLLLY good. Won the Pitching Triple Crown twice; I don't believe any other Yankee has won it even once.

Yankee Tripper
10-27-10, 07:17 PM
Could be inconsistent from year-to-year and burned out early (last great year at age 28, last good year at 30, last decent year at 32) but when he was good he was REALLLLLLLLLY good. Won the Pitching Triple Crown twice; I don't believe any other Yankee has won it even once.
Still 14 years in pinstipes with a career ERA+ of 126. Only Ford at 133 was better over any leanght of time that I could find.

Seemed like the Yanks had a lot of really good pitchers but not lot of really great pitchers when I started looking.

I also found that in my viewing life time (early 70s onward) most of those pitchers I'd consider with the exception of Guidry and Pettitte seemed to spend more of their MLB career in a non-NYY uniform and while they had some good years in New York, were gerneally better at other stops in their career (which kind of threw out Catfish, Clemmens, Cone and a few others for me).

My pretty unscientific list would probably look like -

1 - W. Ford
2 - L. Gomez
3 - R. Guidry
4 - J. Chesbro
5 - R. Ruffing
6 - A. Pettitte
7 - A. Reynolds
8 - M. Mussina
9 - V. Raschi
10 - M. Stottlemeyer

ymike673
10-27-10, 09:01 PM
Here's my list:

1-Ford
2-Ruffing
3-Gomez
4-Pennock
5-Hoyt
6-Stottlemyre
7-Pettitte
8-Guidry
9-Reynolds
10-Chesbro

Amazing how almost no one has Stottlemyre on their list. Look at his total wins pitching on mostly bad Yankees teams. And he is one of only two pitchers that ever beat Gibson in a WS game.

thaa
10-28-10, 04:58 PM
There's another history thread buried in here, about greatest Yankee rotations over the decades. My own favorite would probably be the Raschi, Reynolds, Lopat years.