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b-ball-lunachick
03-17-10, 01:02 PM
I get ESPN magazine with my Insider subscription, but I barely skim through it -- it's just a bad magazine. But there is now a baseball player writing a column as Player X.

I'm not sure how I feel about this...first of all, with the steroid test results leaking out, can this guy really feel safe writing anonymously? And is it good to have someone saying these stories that the player mentioned can't even confront the person making the accusation.

For example, the latest article is about Bill Hall.


In a column about the grind of spring training, the mystery player wrote he “heard a story” that Hall wasn’t focused when he arrived at spring training in 2007 with the Milwaukee Brewers, fresh off a new $24 million contract that was the result of a 35-homer ’06 season.

“Word of his partying made the rounds and guys predicted he was due for a slump,” Player X wrote. “Sure enough, his RBI total dropped to 63, he hit only 14 homers the next season and he was a disaster in the field. It started in spring and he never recovered.”

Hall's response:

“I went out there and got hurt playing hard,” Hall said. “I’ll tell you what, I wish I could ask the guy that wrote that, has he ever seen me dog a ground ball to first base? Has he ever seen me not get to second base on a popup? Just watch me play and make judgments about what kind of person I am and what kind of player I am.”

I started this thread figuring people could:

a) give their opinions on whether they think this Player X thing is a good thing or not
b) if you think, Player X will eventually be outed
c) who you might thing Player X is especially as more stories get published
d) to discuss the story that was actually published - in this case about Hall.

Hellsing
03-17-10, 01:04 PM
http://www.jokesy.com/images/math-jokes-find-x-here-it-is.jpg

Mark19
03-17-10, 01:06 PM
Given that they are trying to inflate the value of Bill Hall, I would put forward the shocking suggestion that perhaps ESPN has hired a Red Sox player

:eek:

Cuban Connection
03-17-10, 01:16 PM
http://www.wafflesandbeatz.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/simpson-mr-x.jpg

Rice14
03-17-10, 01:23 PM
I get ESPN magazine with my Insider subscription, but I barely skim through it -- it's just a bad magazine. But there is now a baseball player writing a column as Player X.
.

I thought I was the only one who did that. Usually mine sits on the counter for a week until my wife just throws it in the recycle bin. Only have it for Insider.

Rice14
03-17-10, 01:24 PM
Given that they are trying to inflate the value of Bill Hall, I would put forward the shocking suggestion that perhaps ESPN has hired a Red Sox player

:eek:

How does that inflate the value of Bill Hall? Another player just bascially called him a dog? Unless there's more in the column that's not posted here?

THEBOSS84
03-17-10, 01:26 PM
I love these columns! I wrote about one in the NBA thread. I read the Spring Training one last week - very entertaining.

EDIT: You actually are talking about the one I read.

THEBOSS84
03-17-10, 01:28 PM
Player X is described as "An MLB Star".

You get the idea he played ST in BOTH Zona and Florida.

Hellsing
03-17-10, 01:30 PM
http://1416andcounting.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/clue-dvd.jpg

Mark19
03-17-10, 01:33 PM
How does that inflate the value of Bill Hall? Another player just bascially called him a dog? Unless there's more in the column that's not posted here?

Implying that his bad performance was due to a temporary attitude problem rather than a lack of talent

b-ball-lunachick
03-17-10, 01:34 PM
I thought I was the only one who did that. Usually mine sits on the counter for a week until my wife just throws it in the recycle bin. Only have it for Insider.
It's just awful..if they made anyone pay for it, nobody would buy it. :D


How does that inflate the value of Bill Hall? Another player just bascially called him a dog? Unless there's more in the column that's not posted here?
I was wondering the same thing...that link is from the Boston Herald:

http://news.bostonherald.com/sports/baseball/red_sox/view/20100315player_x_targets_bill_hall_who_wants_to_know_why/srvc=home&position=recent

I get the feeling it's not a "star" player but a role player...but who knows?

THEBOSS84
03-17-10, 01:35 PM
It's just awful..if they made anyone pay for it, nobody would buy it. :D


I was wondering the same thing...that link is from the Boston Herald:

http://news.bostonherald.com/sports/baseball/red_sox/view/20100315player_x_targets_bill_hall_who_wants_to_know_why/srvc=home&position=recent

I get the feeling it's not a "star" player but a role player...but who knows?

In the bottom left-hand corner of the article, it says "star". It better be one.

Hooligan Tavarez
03-17-10, 01:39 PM
Probably a 2007 Brewer right?

Players from that team you could have called an All-Star at some point in time would be Ben Sheets, Prince Fielder, Ryan Braun, Johnny Estrada, J.J. Hardy, Geoff Jenkins, Corey Hart, Damian Miller, Chris Capuano, Francisco Cordero, and Derrick Turnbow.

THEBOSS84
03-17-10, 01:40 PM
Probably a 2007 Brewer right?

Players from that team you could have called an All-Star at some point in time would be Ben Sheets, Prince Fielder, Ryan Braun, Johnny Estrada, J.J. Hardy, Geoff Jenkins, Corey Hart, Damian Miller, Chris Capuano, Francisco Cordero, and Derrick Turnbow.

It doesn't say that Player X was Hall's teammate.

Hooligan Tavarez
03-17-10, 01:42 PM
It doesn't say that Player X was Hall's teammate.I know that it was just a guess.

teknetic
03-17-10, 01:47 PM
Prince gets my vote.

snarkerella
03-17-10, 01:48 PM
Given that they are trying to inflate the value of Bill Hall, I would put forward the shocking suggestion that perhaps ESPN has hired a Red Sox player

:eek:

Maybe it's one of Gammons' scouts again

Rice14
03-17-10, 01:49 PM
Implying that his bad performance was due to a temporary attitude problem rather than a lack of talent

I dunno, I don't see how calling any player a dog helps his value. If he wanted to inflate his value he would have said something like "Players knew how badly hurt Hall was, even if the media and the fans didn't. They really respected him going out there everyday even if his numbers suffered ...yada yada yada."

I certainly didn't read anything positive or complimentary in those comments.

delv
03-17-10, 02:00 PM
Is Player X like Scout X? that is, not a player at all but another writer?

b-ball-lunachick
03-17-10, 02:04 PM
It doesn't say that Player X was Hall's teammate.
I would think the guy would make sure he told stories about people that weren't his teammate so he wouldn't be accused..maybe I'm just a conspiracy theory person though. :o

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 11:14 AM
this is player x's latest blog:


Last week, Torii Hunter got in some hot water because of comments he supposedly made about African-American and Latino players. Torii is a very well-respected guy in baseball, a forward-thinking guy, and he has been an advocate for diversity in the game. I believe his words misrepresented the way he really thinks. I feel for him for taking so much heat over this, but the whole misunderstanding got me thinking about what a diverse group baseball players really are.

I think baseball is the most diverse of the major league sports in America. And I've never been on a club where I felt there was any racial or ethnic tension among teammates. For the most part we're accepting of one another.

Now, I'm not naïve enough to think issues don't come up now and then. Like any workplace, we tend to segregate ourselves a little bit, hang out with guys that look just like us. Check out the stretching circles before games -- if you look closely you'll notice the Dominican players in one corner, the Puerto Rican guys elsewhere, African-Americans in another spot, the white guys over there and so on. Sometimes players split off in groups of the country guys and the city guys. Sometimes the guys who grew up poor hang out together, separate from the guys who grew up rich. It's remarkable how it happens because it's completely subconscious, but that's the way it's been on every team I've played for. We even joke about it, but never in a mean-spirited way.

Baseball is an international game now and that means different languages are spoken around the clubhouse. Those language barriers create unusual circumstances. For instance, I'd been playing with one teammate for three years before I realized he didn't know my first name. His English was never good enough for us to hang out and have a conversation, so he never learned it. One day, I finally told him my full name and he never forgot it after that. We can laugh about it now.

Cultural differences extend to the field too. For example, American guys think they have to be stoic to be strong. So when we get hit by a pitch we just suck it up and take the base; we're taught not to show pain. But that's not the case everywhere. In Japan, being man enough to show you're in pain is a virtue. When those guys get hit by a pitch they will go to the dugout to get rubbed a little bit. To a Japanese player, the fans see how much he's hurting and know how hard he's working out there.

At the end of the day, we all just want to win baseball games. Are we all best friends? Of course not. But thank goodness we're a diverse group. Playing and traveling for 162 games a season with 24 guys just like me would get really boring.


so we know:

1) he uses an abbreviated first name
2) he's American

THEBOSS84
03-18-10, 11:26 AM
He's been on multiple teams, and with one of those teams for at least 3 years.

Hellsing
03-18-10, 11:29 AM
this is player x's latest blog:

so we know:

1) he uses an abbreviated first name
2) he's American

Or his teammate called him by his last name.

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 11:30 AM
He's been on multiple teams, and with one of those teams for at least 3 years.
the latest one had people guessing a Dodger because they moved ST from Florida to AZ but he could have played for different teams.

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 11:32 AM
Or his teammate called him by his last name.
true..or he had a name like JJ? :D

Here's the full blog that had the stuff about Hall in it (Titled - The Grind of March):


I remember going to spring training as a kid. I was so fired up to see my idols. Until the middle of the fifth inning, that is, when they all ran off. I don't mean they ran off the field to get ready to bat. They literally left the park. Disappeared. I was, like, what the ... ?

I get it now, though, because I leave our home spring games early too. All the vets do. It's like NFL preseason -- the manager pulls you because the backups and Triple-A guys need the work. Unlike football players, though, we don't have to stick around after. By the seventh inning we're at the gym or the batting cage. Pitchers are on the golf course. Some guys are off sipping a beer.

Truth is, the best way for vets to help young guys transition to the majors is to work with them during practice, not games. They're professionals -- they don't need us to be their cheerleaders. Of course, that doesn't mean they don't learn some of their best lessons during games. There's a good story about a rookie catcher years back who was a big fan of Benito Santiago. In his first camp, he got an early at-bat with the five-time All-Star behind the plate. The kid had his uniform all perfect, his shoes shined -- he was looking good and feeling cocky. He tapped the umpire with his bat, then did the same to Santiago. That didn't sit well with Santiago. He showed the kid who owned the plate by spitting a wad of tobacco right on the kid's cleats. Lesson No. 1: Don't mess with a vet.

Camp is long enough without us having to sit and watch the rookies learn those little lessons. We play more than 30 games in less than six weeks, with one day off. One! It's not all bad. A typical day starts with an 8 a.m. breakfast. It's like the Lido deck on a cruise ship, with chefs making pancakes. A few teams with intrepid nutritionists monitor their players' food. Luckily, I'm not on one of those teams. I keep it healthy, but I eat a lot.

After breakfast, we have team meetings. This is also when we have our players' association votes and MLB security talks. That's when they remind us not to get drunk and act stupid around strangers with camera phones. This is an important talk, but 80 percent of the room ignores it. I'm a guy who likes to have a good time, but I'm careful. I rarely drink in our home city because people recognize me. I do my partying on the road.

After meetings, we head to the field to stretch. We go through pickoff moves, rundowns, bunts, cutoffs and relays. Then it's off to BP, then lunch. By game time that afternoon we've put in a good day's work. So me bailing after six isn't so bad, is it?

Even though I'm young and in great shape, my entire body hurts after even half a game. So, I usually just head home and pass out. That's okay because spring training isn't much of a party scene, anyway. But if you must know, Arizona is where the fun is more than Florida; the cleat chasers are all over the desert. Plus, the Cactus League teams are close to one another, so it's easy to meet up with buddies from other clubs. The Grapefruit League is more low-key. It's more about hitting up good restaurants, then heading home for shut-eye. In either place, you'll be exposed if you do something stupid.

I heard a story about Bill Hall when he was with Milwaukee. He was coming off a career year in 2006 when he had 85 RBIs, 35 homers and a new $24 million contract. He showed up to camp pretty loose. He was having fun off the field, too. Word of his partying made the rounds and guys predicted he was due for a slump. Sure enough, his RBI total dropped to 63, he hit only 14 homers the next season and he was a disaster in the field. It started in spring and he never recovered.

Being in the dugout in the ninth inning isn't going to fix a guy's focus problems. But some veteran players have such command of their bodies that they can disrupt their routines in any number of ways and still be successful. It's not sexy, but the best players are always the hardest workers. Matt Holliday, Ryan Braun, Alex Rodriguez? Always the most fit and most prepared you'll ever see. When Roger Clemens -- with or without steroids -- was pitching, he would wear out his arm on purpose before spring training because he wanted to simulate how he'd feel during late-game situations in September. Nobody dared to question that dude's work ethic, or whether or not he was still in the dugout.

THEBOSS84
03-18-10, 11:33 AM
"The cleat chasers are all over the desert".

What an awesome, awesome life these guys have.

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 11:38 AM
"The cleat chasers are all over the desert".

What an awesome, awesome life these guys have.
I did chuckle a bit at cleat chasers. :D

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 11:41 AM
So, here's an older column titled Spring Competition:


I get a lot of questions (e-mail me at playerx@espnthemag.com) asking me whether I'm able to be friends with teammates who are vying for my roster spot. My answer: If you're the projected starter on the team, you just assume everybody else at your position thinks he should have your spot. If you've made it to this point, you're an athlete and you know what to do on the field. It's about being smart and believing in your abilities. You know to stay inside the baseball; you know what it feels like to hit the ball right. You know to have an approach every time you go up to the plate. We all have the tools. Mental toughness is what separates the 4-A guys from guys who have successful careers. When I was battling to be the starter a few years ago, I was confident because I was naive. I wasn't going to show anyone up or say it out loud; I'm not that stupid. But I had faith in what I could do in the field and at the plate. I've learned how hard it is to sustain success in this league, but at the time I had no clue. These guys will learn.

Don't get me wrong -- spring training isn't an outwardly competitive or contentious environment. We all have a blast together. We help each other out and give the young guys advice if they ask. But deep down, everyone knows the deal. The guy on the bench behind me definitely thinks he should be the starter. He did all last year. He's wrong, obviously, but still. It's funny, actually, because we're buddies. But he'd kill me in my sleep for that spot. I can't really worry about what he thinks, though. I mean, good for him. I respect that confidence. If he didn't feel that way, I'd think he was too soft.

My backup is set to make the team, though. For a lot of these players, that's not the case. Everyone dreads when the coaches start making cuts. Usually it happens in the morning. A player gets called into the office like he's going to see the principal, and then you pretty much know what's coming. He'll come out looking shell shocked and start packing up. I always think it's harsh that they have to pack up in front of the rest of us. If he's getting sent down, you just wish him luck during the season, say you're sorry, that kind of impersonal thing. It's not that you don't feel bad; you do. It's just that nothing you say is going to help. Sometimes if it's a really young guy, he's just excited to have had the opportunity. But as it gets later in camp, players take it really hard. I've seen guys cry. I had a good friend who was fighting to make the team last year, and he was holding his breath for the last two weeks. Those were the longest two weeks of his life. You could just see it on his face every single day. At the very end, he got cut. Man, this game can be brutal.


so:

--he was battling to be the starter a few years ago
--he still had a good friend battling for a spot last year

he's probably pretty young...

CoyoteYankee
03-18-10, 03:56 PM
So, here's an older column titled Spring Competition:



so:

--he was battling to be the starter a few years ago
--he still had a good friend battling for a spot last year

he's probably pretty young...

Nancy Drew...:lol:

Just keep a running list of his attributes...we'll figure it out eventually!

Beccash18
03-18-10, 05:15 PM
there are two earlier writings by MLB Player X entitled "Money Matters" (02/19/10) and "Bring on Spring Training" (02/12/10)

I don't have the insider so I was wondering if anyone could post those blog posts as well? They might provide more clues.

bigjf
03-18-10, 06:56 PM
I'm going with Schilling.

RYMASTER or Ryan_Yankees
03-18-10, 07:06 PM
My money is on it being an ESPN writer.

Yankeeah
03-18-10, 07:49 PM
My money is on it being an ESPN writer.

I was thinking that. It's an ESPN writer who gets stories from various players.

dabomb2045
03-18-10, 07:55 PM
Its all ARod's fault

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 10:24 PM
there are two earlier writings by MLB Player X entitled "Money Matters" (02/19/10) and "Bring on Spring Training" (02/12/10)

I don't have the insider so I was wondering if anyone could post those blog posts as well? They might provide more clues.
sure i can post them. :) I wasn't sure if people were interested. :)


Nancy Drew...:lol:

Just keep a running list of his attributes...we'll figure it out eventually!
:lol: or Kinsey Millhone. :D

for all we know, he's stretching the truth - like he was really fighting for a job 5 years ago not 2 or 3, you know? :D

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 10:30 PM
titled Five spring training excuses


Spring training is under way, which means it's time for really lame complaints and excuses from major leaguers. I'm always amazed by what some guys come up with in the first few weeks of a very long season to explain why they're not performing. Among my favorites …

"My timing at the plate is just off."
How in the world could your timing be off? All you've had to focus on for at least three months is hitting. You should be hitting off a tee, working with a pitching machine and focusing on eye and reflex drills throughout the offseason. If "timing" is your problem, you have commitment issues.

"I've got dead arm."
Really? Your arm should be rested and conditioned better than it is in the middle of the season. Coaches are really easy on guys about this one because they're uber-careful with potential injuries to pitchers. Our manager may err on the side of caution, but teammates know when you've just plain shown up weak.

"It's the jet lag."
I cannot count the number of guys I've heard claim that jet lag is the reason they came in sluggish to camp. I also do not know one guy who takes a flight more than three hours to spring training. Three hours does not constitute jet lag. You'd be shocked at how much I hear this one.

"My back is sore."
A sore back means you overdid it on the golf course. During spring training, players are dying to get to the golf course after workouts and games. Their sunburn is usually a dead giveaway.

"I'm in the best shape of my life."
This may not sound like an excuse, but it's a set-up. If a guy says he's in the best shape of his life, he's not. He's either (A) built new muscles that he will pull or strain by August or (B) simply lost the 20 pounds he gained over the winter break. My favorite example of this is Heath Bell (who's a great guy, by the way), who once claimed to have gotten into great offseason shape by playing Wii Fit with his kid. Heath, you can afford a gym membership, and it will do you a lot more good than a video game workout.

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 10:31 PM
Titled Money Matters:


A lot of baseball players have short memories. I don't mean on the field; I mean with their wallets. In the minors, you make nothing, maybe $200 or $300 per paycheck. If you make it to the majors, you get a nice raise, but the team will keep you at the league minimum as long as it can. Most guys have to find a way to stay in the majors for three years in order to get a new contract. I know of players who, because of family situations, ended up in big debt by the time that next contract came around. Some of us are exceptions; we get long-term deals early or we get nice signing bonuses, but that's rare. It'd be nice to have a 10-year window to make good money, but we're not all so lucky.

Knowing this, you'd think guys wouldn't be so dumb with their money. But for every veteran who is smart and knows he should save and invest, maybe even start a business -- Tom Glavine, Carlos Lee and Albert Pujols are known to be some of the smartest money guys in baseball -- there's a guy who's blowing his salary on cars and private jets. I've heard stories about players who spend $60,000 on clothes, entertaining women with alcohol and, you know, paying for various other services at clubs. Some of these guys realize they can't control themselves, so they have their agents watch over their money for them. Grown men, on an allowance. Imagine that.

Pros aren't always reckless, though. Sometimes a player can blow money just by being a nice guy. People have a tendency to think major leaguers are millionaires before they really are (and some of us never will be). Everyone expects you to buy things for them, to pick up the tab or to contribute to their charity. Sometimes, even the team is taking a little from you. It's not unheard of for a team to write into your contract that a certain portion of your salary must be donated to a specific charity that the team supports. Now, don't get me wrong -- I'm all for giving my time and money to charities (I got more than 50 charity requests this offseason, but more on that at a later date). It's just that when I do give, I think it should be personal, a cause I believe in. I'm trying to be smart about the way I handle my affairs. Because no matter how good you are at baseball, if you spend like an idiot, you end up broke.

b-ball-lunachick
03-18-10, 10:33 PM
Titled Bring on Spring Training:


Remember in elementary school when you had to write that essay about what you did on your summer vacation? For my first MLB Player X blog entry, I've decided to tell you fans what major leaguers do on our, well, let's call it our offseason. (Don't worry, soon enough I'll get into the other parts of the major league life: the money, the agents, the road.) Because our time off sure as hell isn't a vacation.

The first two weeks after the season ends are really our only time off. That's when we take it easy, let our bodies recover. I typically go somewhere fun with my family for a week or two; I see so little of them during the season. But make no mistake, ball players (the good ones, at least) don't spend all winter on the beach. It's a short break then back to work.

Most guys I know start lifting and running by November. Our routines are all different, though. Some players lift like body builders, using heavy weight to build mass. Other guys don't want to get too big, so they focus on endurance and flexibility. There are a lot of different philosophies, but I feel like core and functional training is the most important. My theory is that getting too bulky isn't a good idea, but I definitely want to be strong in the places where I use my muscles most.

Whatever our approach, the reality of being a major leaguer is this: If you don't train hard you won't last in this league. Not for 162 games plus the playoffs. Players with the most success are typically the ones who work their butts off. Sure, there are some exceptions to the rule, where a dude is so gifted he doesn't have to put in the work (Bonds and Clemens got media attention for their training regimens, but every major leaguer knew those guys were just more talented than the rest of us). Getting by on your gifts is rare. And I'm not about to risk it to find out if I'm one of those guys who is so talented he can kick back and still be an All-Star.

When I start back to training in the offseason, I ease in with a full-body workout on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. After lifting weights, I finish with a little hitting. On off days, I'll get in some cardio. But instead of a treadmill I'll run football routes with my family, play tennis or shoot hoops. I've gotta be active but careful -- if I get hurt, my manager, my agent (especially my agent) and my teammates will let me have it.

By mid-November, things intensify. I kick up my workouts and work on focus. Eye drills are very important for me, since they help with timing and instinct. The best drill for this is getting really close to a tennis ball machine, turning it on a high speed, and catching every ball that comes out. When New Year's rolls around, I go full throttle baseball. That's when I start sprinting (I get more sore from sprinting than I do from lifting weights) and throwing (If I start throwing any earlier than January, my arm will be toast by July.) All of it hurts, but at the end of it I know I'm ready for spring training, which is an awesome feeling. Man, I get fired up about the season.

Here's an average day in my offseason, beginning at 8:45 a.m. and ending at 8 p.m. It's a 15-step process:

1. Wake up and eat
2. Head to workout facility
3. Stretch and warm-up routine focused on agility and core. I work my hip flexors, do lunges, jump rope, tap the ladders.
4. Sprint work. Fast as I can.
5. Lift weights. I do traditional regular sets, plus some core, balance exercises and some plyometrics. I finish with an over-the-top, insanely tough lift.
6. Stretch again
7. Throw with my workout partner
8. Hit
9. Eat lunch!
10. Hit more
11. Focus drills, eye drills
12. More throwing
13. More hitting
14. Dinner
15. Head home

delv
03-18-10, 10:35 PM
definitely a writer

allybear
03-19-10, 12:44 PM
I dunno - they had a football player doing Player X football stories through the season, and they even had Driver X right around Daytona. I like them (better than a lot of the rest of the magazine, usually), whoever they are writing - they're at least entertaining.

Reggie Smith
03-19-10, 12:58 PM
Hmm, to me, those who hide behind the anonimity of the internet to throw darts at people are chickens.

Oh, wait...

b-ball-lunachick
03-19-10, 01:04 PM
Hmm, to me, those who hide behind the anonimity of the internet to throw darts at people are chickens.

Oh, wait...
or hot dobs. :D
http://www.poshposh.com/hot_dog.jpg

Blazer
03-19-10, 01:30 PM
Aaron Rowand is my guess.

bnorris85
03-19-10, 02:13 PM
Most likely not a pitcher because in one of the posts says when they are hit by a pitch they try not to show any pain....although he might be an NL pitcher, but my guess is a batter.

THEBOSS84
03-19-10, 02:15 PM
Wait, are we supposed to assume that all these articles are written by the same player? That's not the way I took it...

Beccash18
03-19-10, 06:07 PM
Wait, are we supposed to assume that all these articles are written by the same player? That's not the way I took it...

Now that's an interesting thought. Makes it much more difficult to figure out who it is if there's more than one contributor.

CoyoteYankee
03-19-10, 07:33 PM
Wait, are we supposed to assume that all these articles are written by the same player? That's not the way I took it...

Interesting. I assumed it was one person. My bad.

Yankeeah
03-19-10, 08:12 PM
Wait, are we supposed to assume that all these articles are written by the same player? That's not the way I took it...

I said it a few pages back, but I think it's a writer getting stories from various players.

Blazer
03-19-10, 08:46 PM
I said it a few pages back, but I think it's a writer getting stories from various players.

From the little I've read it appears to be the same writer.

Yankeeah
03-19-10, 08:58 PM
From the little I've read it appears to be the same writer.

I think the writer is the same, but I don't think the writer is a player. I think the writer is an actual writer who is gathering stories from various players.